Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling

Authors: Senington, B., Lee, R.Y. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

Volume: 59

Issue: 7-8

Pages: 1475-1484

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-021-02381-3

Abstract:

The use of inertial sensors in fast bowling analysis may offer a cheaper and portable alternative to current methodologies. However, no previous studies have assessed the validity and reliability of such methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of collecting tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics using inertial sensors during in vivo fast bowling. Thirty-five elite male fast bowlers volunteered for this study. An accelerometer attached to the skin over the tibia was used to determine impacts and inertial sensors over the S1, L1 and T1 spinous processes used to derive the relative kinematics. These measurements were compared to optoelectronic and force plate data for validity analysis. Most acceleration and kinematics variables measured report significant correlations > 0.8 with the corresponding gold standard measurement, with intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.7. Low standard error of measurement and consequently small minimum detectable change (MDC) values were also observed. This study demonstrates that inertial sensors are as valid and reliable as current methods of fast bowling analysis and may provide some advantages over traditional methods. The novel metrics and methods described in this study may aid coaches and practitioners in the design and monitoring of fast bowling technique. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] Graphical abstract illustrating the synopsis of the findings from this paper.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: Scopus

Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling.

Authors: Senington, B., Lee, R.Y. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Med Biol Eng Comput

Volume: 59

Issue: 7-8

Pages: 1475-1484

eISSN: 1741-0444

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-021-02381-3

Abstract:

The use of inertial sensors in fast bowling analysis may offer a cheaper and portable alternative to current methodologies. However, no previous studies have assessed the validity and reliability of such methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of collecting tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics using inertial sensors during in vivo fast bowling. Thirty-five elite male fast bowlers volunteered for this study. An accelerometer attached to the skin over the tibia was used to determine impacts and inertial sensors over the S1, L1 and T1 spinous processes used to derive the relative kinematics. These measurements were compared to optoelectronic and force plate data for validity analysis. Most acceleration and kinematics variables measured report significant correlations > 0.8 with the corresponding gold standard measurement, with intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.7. Low standard error of measurement and consequently small minimum detectable change (MDC) values were also observed. This study demonstrates that inertial sensors are as valid and reliable as current methods of fast bowling analysis and may provide some advantages over traditional methods. The novel metrics and methods described in this study may aid coaches and practitioners in the design and monitoring of fast bowling technique. Graphical abstract illustrating the synopsis of the findings from this paper.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: PubMed

Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling

Authors: Senington, B., Lee, R.Y. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: MEDICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING & COMPUTING

Volume: 59

Issue: 7-8

Pages: 1475-1484

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-021-02381-3

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling

Authors: Billy, S., Raymond, L. and Williams, J.

Journal: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 0140-0118

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: Manual

Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling.

Authors: Senington, B., Lee, R.Y. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Medical & biological engineering & computing

Volume: 59

Issue: 7-8

Pages: 1475-1484

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-021-02381-3

Abstract:

The use of inertial sensors in fast bowling analysis may offer a cheaper and portable alternative to current methodologies. However, no previous studies have assessed the validity and reliability of such methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of collecting tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics using inertial sensors during in vivo fast bowling. Thirty-five elite male fast bowlers volunteered for this study. An accelerometer attached to the skin over the tibia was used to determine impacts and inertial sensors over the S1, L1 and T1 spinous processes used to derive the relative kinematics. These measurements were compared to optoelectronic and force plate data for validity analysis. Most acceleration and kinematics variables measured report significant correlations > 0.8 with the corresponding gold standard measurement, with intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.7. Low standard error of measurement and consequently small minimum detectable change (MDC) values were also observed. This study demonstrates that inertial sensors are as valid and reliable as current methods of fast bowling analysis and may provide some advantages over traditional methods. The novel metrics and methods described in this study may aid coaches and practitioners in the design and monitoring of fast bowling technique. Graphical abstract illustrating the synopsis of the findings from this paper.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Validity and reliability of innovative field measurements of tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics during cricket fast bowling

Authors: Billy, S., Raymond, L. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

Volume: 59

Pages: 1475-1484

ISSN: 0140-0118

Abstract:

The use of inertial sensors in fast bowling analysis may offer a cheaper and portable alternative to current methodologies. However, no previous studies have assessed the validity and reliability of such methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of collecting tibial accelerations and spinal kinematics using inertial sensors during in vivo fast bowling. Thirty-five elite male fast bowlers volunteered for this study. An accelerometer attached to the skin over the tibia was used to determine impacts and inertial sensors over the S1, L1 and T1 spinous processes used to derive the relative kinematics. These measurements were compared to optoelectronic and force plate data for validity analysis. Most acceleration and kinematics variables measured report significant correlations > 0.8 with the corresponding gold standard measurement, with intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.7. Low standard error of measurement and consequently small minimum detectable change (MDC) values were also observed. This study demonstrates that inertial sensors are as valid and reliable as current methods of fast bowling analysis and may provide some advantages over traditional methods. The novel metrics and methods described in this study may aid coaches and practitioners in the design and monitoring of fast bowling technique. Graphical abstract illustrating the synopsis of the findings from this paper.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35690/

Source: BURO EPrints