Do automated real-time feedback devices improve CPR quality? A systematic review of literature.

Authors: Gugelmin-Almeida, D., Tobase, L., Polastri, T.F., Peres, H.H.C. and Timerman, S.

Journal: Resusc Plus

Volume: 6

Pages: 100108

eISSN: 2666-5204

DOI: 10.1016/j.resplu.2021.100108

Abstract:

Aim: Automated real-time feedback devices have been considered a potential tool to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Despite previous studies supporting the usefulness of such devices during training, others have conflicting conclusions regarding its efficacy during real-life CPR. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of automated real-time feedback devices for improving CPR performance during training, simulation and real-life resuscitation attempts in the adult and paediatric population. Methods: Articles published between January 2010 and November 2020 were searched from BVS, Cinahl, Cochrane, PubMed and Web of Science, and reviewed according to a pre-defined set of eligibility criteria which included healthcare providers and randomised controlled trial studies. CPR quality was assessed based on guideline compliance for chest compression rate, chest compression depth and residual leaning. Results: The selection strategy led to 19 eligible studies, 16 in training/simulation and three in real-life CPR. Feedback devices during training and/or simulation resulted in improved acquisition of skills and enhanced performance in 15 studies. One study resulted in no significant improvement. During real resuscitation attempts, three studies demonstrated significant improvement with the use of feedback devices in comparison with standard CPR (without feedback device). Conclusion: The use of automated real-time feedback devices enhances skill acquisition and CPR performance during training of healthcare professionals. Further research is needed to better understand the role of feedback devices in clinical setting.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35761/

Source: PubMed

Do automated real-time feedback devices improve CPR quality? A systematic review of literature

Authors: Gugelmin-Almeida, D., Tobase, L., Polastri, T.F., Ciqueto Peres, H.H. and Timerman, S.

Journal: RESUSCITATION PLUS

Volume: 6

ISSN: 2666-5204

DOI: 10.1016/j.resplu.2021.100108

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35761/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Do automated real-time feedback devices improve CPR quality? A systematic review of literature.

Authors: Gugelmin-Almeida, D., Tobase, L., Polastri, T.F., Peres, H.H.C. and Timerman, S.

Journal: Resuscitation plus

Volume: 6

Pages: 100108

eISSN: 2666-5204

ISSN: 2666-5204

DOI: 10.1016/j.resplu.2021.100108

Abstract:

Aim

Automated real-time feedback devices have been considered a potential tool to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Despite previous studies supporting the usefulness of such devices during training, others have conflicting conclusions regarding its efficacy during real-life CPR. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of automated real-time feedback devices for improving CPR performance during training, simulation and real-life resuscitation attempts in the adult and paediatric population.

Methods

Articles published between January 2010 and November 2020 were searched from BVS, Cinahl, Cochrane, PubMed and Web of Science, and reviewed according to a pre-defined set of eligibility criteria which included healthcare providers and randomised controlled trial studies. CPR quality was assessed based on guideline compliance for chest compression rate, chest compression depth and residual leaning.

Results

The selection strategy led to 19 eligible studies, 16 in training/simulation and three in real-life CPR. Feedback devices during training and/or simulation resulted in improved acquisition of skills and enhanced performance in 15 studies. One study resulted in no significant improvement. During real resuscitation attempts, three studies demonstrated significant improvement with the use of feedback devices in comparison with standard CPR (without feedback device).

Conclusion

The use of automated real-time feedback devices enhances skill acquisition and CPR performance during training of healthcare professionals. Further research is needed to better understand the role of feedback devices in clinical setting.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35761/

Source: Europe PubMed Central