The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is there a role for education?

Authors: Bello, A.A., Agabo, T. and Adedoyin, F.F.

Journal: Environmental Challenges

Volume: 5

eISSN: 2667-0100

DOI: 10.1016/j.envc.2021.100234

Abstract:

Sub-Saharan Africa has been one of the most affected regions in the world by the emissions-induced climate crisis. Even though the region is not the biggest emitter of CO2 globally it is important to understand the dynamics of emissions in the sub-continent. This study takes a look at one of those determinants –education. Specifically, the study attempts to unravel the role of education on C02 emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. To achieve this aim, the study adopts a sample of 46 countries in the region and employs data covering the period 1996–2018. The estimations are carried out using four estimators (Pooled OLS, Fixed Effects, Random Effects and System-GMM). The findings of the study reveal that the improvement in education has two different impacts on C02 emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. On one hand, the Pooled OLS reveal a negative relationship between education and emissions – (0.000374%) while the random Effects and system GMM reveal a positive relationship between education and C02 emissions (0.000934% & 0.000233% in the region. Similarly, energy consumption is positively associated with carbon emissions (0.0209%). More so, the study suggests that efforts be made to improve education with an emphasis on the harmful effects of emissions to the environment as this will aid to reduce emission-related activities in Sub-Saharan Africa.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35945/

Source: Scopus

The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is there a role for education?

Authors: Bello, A.A., Agabo, T. and Adedoyin, F.F.

Journal: Environmental Challenges

Volume: 5

DOI: 10.1016/j.envc.2021.100234

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35945/

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85112278918&doi=10.1016%2fj.envc.2021.100234&partnerID=40&md5=7a6df17c14b53a71d191e5cb5acec580

Source: Manual

The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is there a role for education?

Authors: Bello, A.A., Agabo, T. and Adedoyin, F.F.

Journal: Environmental Challenges

Volume: 5

Issue: December

ISSN: 2667-0100

Abstract:

Sub-Saharan Africa has been one of the most affected regions in the world by the emissions-induced climate crisis. Even though the region is not the biggest emitter of CO2 globally it is important to understand the dynamics of emissions in the sub-continent. This study takes a look at one of those determinants –education. Specifically, the study attempts to unravel the role of education on C02 emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. To achieve this aim, the study adopts a sample of 46 countries in the region and employs data covering the period 1996–2018. The estimations are carried out using four estimators (Pooled OLS, Fixed Effects, Random Effects and System-GMM). The findings of the study reveal that the improvement in education has two different impacts on C02 emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. On one hand, the Pooled OLS reveal a negative relationship between education and emissions – (0.000374%) while the random Effects and system GMM reveal a positive relationship between education and C02 emissions (0.000934% & 0.000233% in the region. Similarly, energy consumption is positively associated with carbon emissions (0.0209%). More so, the study suggests that efforts be made to improve education with an emphasis on the harmful effects of emissions to the environment as this will aid to reduce emission-related activities in Sub-Saharan Africa.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35945/

Source: BURO EPrints