Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical management, and public health implications of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Authors: Sathian, B., van Teijlingen, E.R. et al.

Journal: Nepal J Epidemiol

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 1103-1125

ISSN: 2091-0800

DOI: 10.3126/nje.v11i4.41911

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, is exponentially spreading across the globe. METHODS: The current systematic review was performed utilising the following electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We searched for the keywords "COVID-19 AND "pregnancy" between January 1, 2020 until December 31, 2020. RESULTS: Out of 4005 records which were identified, 36 original studies were included in this systematic review. Pooled prevalence of vertical transmission was 10%, 95% CI: 4-17%. Pooled prevalence of neonatal mortality was 7%, 95% CI: 0-21%. CONCLUSION: The contemporary evidence suggests that the incubation period of COVID-19 is 2-14 days, and this infection could be transmitted even from the infected asymptomatic individuals. It is found that the clinical presentation of pregnant women with COVID-19 infection is comparable with the infected non-pregnant females, and the frequent symptoms were fever, cough, myalgia, sore throat and malaise. Some cases have severe maternal morbidity and perinatal deaths secondary to COVID-19 infection. Under these circumstances, pregnant women should focus on maintaining personal hygiene, proper nutrition and extreme social distancing to reduce the risk of COVID-19. Therefore, systematic data reporting for evidence based clinical assessment, management and pregnancy outcomes is essential for preventing of COVID-19 infection among pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36443/

Source: PubMed

Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical management, and public health implications of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Authors: Sathian, B., van Teijlingen, E.R. et al.

Journal: NEPAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 1103-1125

ISSN: 2091-0800

DOI: 10.3126/nje.v11i4.41911

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36443/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical management and Public Health Implications of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and meta-analysis

Authors: Sathian, B., van Teijlingen, E. et al.

Journal: Nepal Journal of Epidemiology

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 1103-1125

Publisher: International Nepal Epidemiological Association (INEA)

ISSN: 2091-0800

DOI: 10.3126/nje.v11i4.41911

Abstract:

Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, is exponentially spreading across the globe.

Methods: The current systematic review was performed utilizing electronic databases i.e. PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We searched for the keywords "COVID-19 AND "pregnancy" between January 1st, 2020 until December 31, 2020.

Results: Out of 4005 records which were identified, 36 original studies were included in this systematic review. Pooled prevalence of vertical transmission was 10%, 95% CI: 4-17%. Pooled prevalence of neonatal mortality was 7%, 95% CI: 0-21%.

Conclusion: The contemporary evidence suggests that the incubation period of COVID-19 is 2-14 days, and this infection could be transmitted even from the infected asymptomatic individuals. It is found that the clinical presentation of pregnant women with COVID-19 infection is comparable with the infected non-pregnant females, and the frequent symptoms were fever, cough, myalgia, sore throat and malaise. There are some cases with severe maternal morbidity and perinatal deaths secondary to COVID-19 infection. Under these circumstances, the pregnant women should focus on maintaining personal hygiene, proper nutrition and extreme social distancing to reduce the risk of COVID-19. Therefore, a systematic data reporting for evidence base clinical assessment, management and pregnancy outcomes is essential for prevention of COVID-19 infection among pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36443/

Source: Manual

Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical management, and public health implications of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Authors: Sathian, B., van Teijlingen, E.R. et al.

Journal: Nepal journal of epidemiology

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 1103-1125

eISSN: 2091-0800

ISSN: 2091-0800

DOI: 10.3126/nje.v11i4.41911

Abstract:

Background

The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, is exponentially spreading across the globe.

Methods

The current systematic review was performed utilising the following electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We searched for the keywords "COVID-19 AND "pregnancy" between January 1, 2020 until December 31, 2020.

Results

Out of 4005 records which were identified, 36 original studies were included in this systematic review. Pooled prevalence of vertical transmission was 10%, 95% CI: 4-17%. Pooled prevalence of neonatal mortality was 7%, 95% CI: 0-21%.

Conclusion

The contemporary evidence suggests that the incubation period of COVID-19 is 2-14 days, and this infection could be transmitted even from the infected asymptomatic individuals. It is found that the clinical presentation of pregnant women with COVID-19 infection is comparable with the infected non-pregnant females, and the frequent symptoms were fever, cough, myalgia, sore throat and malaise. Some cases have severe maternal morbidity and perinatal deaths secondary to COVID-19 infection. Under these circumstances, pregnant women should focus on maintaining personal hygiene, proper nutrition and extreme social distancing to reduce the risk of COVID-19. Therefore, systematic data reporting for evidence based clinical assessment, management and pregnancy outcomes is essential for preventing of COVID-19 infection among pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36443/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Epidemiologic characteristics, clinical management and Public Health Implications of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and meta-analysis

Authors: Sathian, B., van Teijlingen, E. et al.

Journal: Nepal Journal of Epidemiology

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 1103-1125

ISSN: 2091-0800

Abstract:

Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, is exponentially spreading across the globe. Methods: The current systematic review was performed utilizing electronic databases i.e. PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. We searched for the keywords "COVID-19 AND "pregnancy" between January 1st, 2020 until December 31, 2020. Results: Out of 4005 records which were identified, 36 original studies were included in this systematic review. Pooled prevalence of vertical transmission was 10%, 95% CI: 4-17%. Pooled prevalence of neonatal mortality was 7%, 95% CI: 0-21%. Conclusion: The contemporary evidence suggests that the incubation period of COVID-19 is 2-14 days, and this infection could be transmitted even from the infected asymptomatic individuals. It is found that the clinical presentation of pregnant women with COVID-19 infection is comparable with the infected non-pregnant females, and the frequent symptoms were fever, cough, myalgia, sore throat and malaise. There are some cases with severe maternal morbidity and perinatal deaths secondary to COVID-19 infection. Under these circumstances, the pregnant women should focus on maintaining personal hygiene, proper nutrition and extreme social distancing to reduce the risk of COVID-19. Therefore, a systematic data reporting for evidence base clinical assessment, management and pregnancy outcomes is essential for prevention of COVID-19 infection among pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36443/

Source: BURO EPrints