Human factors and ergonomics systems-based tools for understanding and addressing global problems of the twenty-first century

Authors: Thatcher, A., Nayak, R. and Waterson, P.

Journal: Ergonomics

Volume: 63

Issue: 3

Pages: 367-387

eISSN: 1366-5847

ISSN: 0014-0139

DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2019.1646925

Abstract:

Sustainability is a systems problem with humans as integral elements of the system. However, sustainability problems usually have a broader scope than socio-technical systems and therefore, require additional considerations. This requires a fuller integration of complex systems understanding into the systems analysis toolset currently available to human factors and ergonomics. In this paper, we outline these complex systems requirements necessary to tackle global problems such as sustainability and then assess how three common systems analysis tools (i.e. Accimap, System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes, and Cognitive Work Analysis) stand up against these revised criteria. This assessment is then further explored through applying two of these tools (i.e. Accimap and System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes) to a transnational food integrity system problem. This case study shows that no single systems analysis method can be used in isolation to help identify key insights for intervention and that new methods may need to be developed or existing methods need to be adapted to understand these dynamic, adaptive systems. The implications for the further development of systems analysis tools are discussed. Practitioner summary: We assess the applicability of existing human factors and ergonomics systems-analysis tools for examining global problems and for identifying points to intervene in these systems. We comment on what extensions and further work will be required to enable human factors and ergonomics to intervene effectively. Abbreviations: HFE: human factors and ergonomics; CO2: carbon dioxide; CO: carbon monoxide; O3: ozone; SSoS: sustainable system-of-systems; BSE: bovine spongiform encephalopathy; STAMP: systems-theoretic accident model; CWA: cognitive work analysis; WDA: work domain analysis; ConTA: control task analysis; StrA: strategies analysis; SOCA: social and organisation cooperation analysis; SOCA-CAT: social and organisation cooperation analysis contextual analysis template; SOCA-DL: social and organisation cooperation analysis decision ladder; WOP: work organisation possibilities; FRAM: functional resonance analysis method; US FDA: United States Food and Drug Administration; UK: United Kingdom; NET-HARMS: networked hazard analysis and risk management system; PreMiSTS: predicting malfunctions in socio-technical systems.

Source: Scopus

Human factors and ergonomics systems-based tools for understanding and addressing global problems of the twenty-first century.

Authors: Thatcher, A., Nayak, R. and Waterson, P.

Journal: Ergonomics

Volume: 63

Issue: 3

Pages: 367-387

eISSN: 1366-5847

DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2019.1646925

Abstract:

Sustainability is a systems problem with humans as integral elements of the system. However, sustainability problems usually have a broader scope than socio-technical systems and therefore, require additional considerations. This requires a fuller integration of complex systems understanding into the systems analysis toolset currently available to human factors and ergonomics. In this paper, we outline these complex systems requirements necessary to tackle global problems such as sustainability and then assess how three common systems analysis tools (i.e. Accimap, System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes, and Cognitive Work Analysis) stand up against these revised criteria. This assessment is then further explored through applying two of these tools (i.e. Accimap and System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes) to a transnational food integrity system problem. This case study shows that no single systems analysis method can be used in isolation to help identify key insights for intervention and that new methods may need to be developed or existing methods need to be adapted to understand these dynamic, adaptive systems. The implications for the further development of systems analysis tools are discussed. Practitioner summary: We assess the applicability of existing human factors and ergonomics systems-analysis tools for examining global problems and for identifying points to intervene in these systems. We comment on what extensions and further work will be required to enable human factors and ergonomics to intervene effectively. Abbreviations: HFE: human factors and ergonomics; CO2: carbon dioxide; CO: carbon monoxide; O3: ozone; SSoS: sustainable system-of-systems; BSE: bovine spongiform encephalopathy; STAMP: systems-theoretic accident model; CWA: cognitive work analysis; WDA: work domain analysis; ConTA: control task analysis; StrA: strategies analysis; SOCA: social and organisation cooperation analysis; SOCA-CAT: social and organisation cooperation analysis contextual analysis template; SOCA-DL: social and organisation cooperation analysis decision ladder; WOP: work organisation possibilities; FRAM: functional resonance analysis method; US FDA: United States Food and Drug Administration; UK: United Kingdom; NET-HARMS: networked hazard analysis and risk management system; PreMiSTS: predicting malfunctions in socio-technical systems.

Source: PubMed

Human factors and ergonomics systems-based tools for understanding and addressing global problems of the twenty-first century.

Authors: Thatcher, A., Nayak, R. and Waterson, P.

Journal: Ergonomics

Volume: 63

Issue: 3

Pages: 367-387

eISSN: 1366-5847

ISSN: 0014-0139

DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2019.1646925

Abstract:

Sustainability is a systems problem with humans as integral elements of the system. However, sustainability problems usually have a broader scope than socio-technical systems and therefore, require additional considerations. This requires a fuller integration of complex systems understanding into the systems analysis toolset currently available to human factors and ergonomics. In this paper, we outline these complex systems requirements necessary to tackle global problems such as sustainability and then assess how three common systems analysis tools (i.e. Accimap, System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes, and Cognitive Work Analysis) stand up against these revised criteria. This assessment is then further explored through applying two of these tools (i.e. Accimap and System Theoretic Accident Mapping and Processes) to a transnational food integrity system problem. This case study shows that no single systems analysis method can be used in isolation to help identify key insights for intervention and that new methods may need to be developed or existing methods need to be adapted to understand these dynamic, adaptive systems. The implications for the further development of systems analysis tools are discussed. Practitioner summary: We assess the applicability of existing human factors and ergonomics systems-analysis tools for examining global problems and for identifying points to intervene in these systems. We comment on what extensions and further work will be required to enable human factors and ergonomics to intervene effectively. Abbreviations: HFE: human factors and ergonomics; CO2: carbon dioxide; CO: carbon monoxide; O3: ozone; SSoS: sustainable system-of-systems; BSE: bovine spongiform encephalopathy; STAMP: systems-theoretic accident model; CWA: cognitive work analysis; WDA: work domain analysis; ConTA: control task analysis; StrA: strategies analysis; SOCA: social and organisation cooperation analysis; SOCA-CAT: social and organisation cooperation analysis contextual analysis template; SOCA-DL: social and organisation cooperation analysis decision ladder; WOP: work organisation possibilities; FRAM: functional resonance analysis method; US FDA: United States Food and Drug Administration; UK: United Kingdom; NET-HARMS: networked hazard analysis and risk management system; PreMiSTS: predicting malfunctions in socio-technical systems.

Source: Europe PubMed Central