Online social transparency in enterprise information systems: a risk assessment method

Authors: Alsaedi, T., Sherief, N., Phalp, K. and Ali, R.

Journal: Information Technology and Management

Volume: 23

Issue: 2

Pages: 95-124

eISSN: 1573-7667

ISSN: 1385-951X

DOI: 10.1007/s10799-021-00347-3

Abstract:

Teleworking refers to the utilization of information and communication technologies for work done outside the workplace. The Covid-19 crisis led to increased utilisation of social networking tools within enterprises, especially when working remotely. The aim of their use is often to improve situational awareness, coordination, and collaboration amongst employees. Online social transparency, typically done through social networks or enterprise social software, refers to the voluntary sharing of personal and contextual information such as those relating to their own and team status, intentions, motivation, capabilities, goal priorities besides updates on the physical and social context, with other colleagues. An ad-hoc practice of social transparency can introduce risks such as information overload, social loafing and peer pressure. Despite recognising its adverse effects, there is a lack of systematic methods that identify and assess the risks of online social transparency. In this paper, we present a method to identify and evaluate these within enterprises. We present the method’s workflow, stakeholders, the novel artefacts and techniques devised to use and the outcomes to produce. We evaluate our proposed method by applying it in a real organisational context and assess applicability, efficiency, and effectiveness in identifying risks and supporting managers in risk assessment. The results showed that the method gives a framework of thinking and analysis and helps recognize and identify risks in a specialized manner.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36473/

Source: Scopus

Online social transparency in enterprise information systems: a risk assessment method

Authors: Alsaedi, T., Sherief, N., Phalp, K. and Ali, R.

Journal: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & MANAGEMENT

Volume: 23

Issue: 2

Pages: 95-124

eISSN: 1573-7667

ISSN: 1385-951X

DOI: 10.1007/s10799-021-00347-3

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36473/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Online social transparency in enterprise information systems: a risk assessment method

Authors: Alsaedi, T., Sherief, N., Phalp, K.T. and Ali, R.

Journal: Information Technology and Management

Volume: 23

Pages: 95-124

ISSN: 1385-951X

Abstract:

Teleworking refers to the utilization of information and communication technologies for work done outside the workplace. The Covid-19 crisis led to increased utilisation of social networking tools within enterprises, especially when working remotely. The aim of their use is often to improve situational awareness, coordination, and collaboration amongst employees. Online social transparency, typically done through social networks or enterprise social software, refers to the voluntary sharing of personal and contextual information such as those relating to their own and team status, intentions, motivation, capabilities, goal priorities besides updates on the physical and social context, with other colleagues. An ad-hoc practice of social transparency can introduce risks such as information overload, social loafing and peer pressure. Despite recognising its adverse effects, there is a lack of systematic methods that identify and assess the risks of online social transparency. In this paper, we present a method to identify and evaluate these within enterprises. We present the method’s workflow, stakeholders, the novel artefacts and techniques devised to use and the outcomes to produce. We evaluate our proposed method by applying it in a real organisational context and assess applicability, efficiency, and effectiveness in identifying risks and supporting managers in risk assessment. The results showed that the method gives a framework of thinking and analysis and helps recognize and identify risks in a specialized manner.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36473/

Source: BURO EPrints