Human rights education in Japan: An historical account, characteristics and suggestions for a better-balanced approach

This source preferred by Sachiko Takeda

Authors: Takeda, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29372/

Journal: Cambridge Journal of Education

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 83-96

eISSN: 1469-3577

ISSN: 0305-764X

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Takeda, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29372/

Journal: Cambridge Journal of Education

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 83-96

eISSN: 1469-3577

ISSN: 0305-764X

DOI: 10.1080/0305764X.2011.651203

Although human rights are often expressed as universal tenets, the concept was conceived in a particular socio-political and historical context. Conceptualisations and practice of human rights vary across societies, and face numerous challenges. After providing an historical account of the conceptualisation of human rights in Japanese society, this paper examines human rights education in Japan, focusing on implementation of the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education. Whilst the Decade's Action Plan advocates a comprehensive approach, Japanese human rights education focuses far less attention on imparting knowledge and developing learners' attitudes, placing strong emphasis on aspects of responsibility and harmonious human relations understood in the historical context of Japanese moral education. Pedagogical proposals are made to promote a comprehensive approach, including focus on the role of empowering learners, enabling them to protect themselves by invoking human rights. © 2012 Copyright University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Takeda, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29372/

Journal: CAMBRIDGE JOURNAL OF EDUCATION

Volume: 42

Issue: 1

Pages: 83-96

ISSN: 0305-764X

DOI: 10.1080/0305764X.2011.651203

The data on this page was last updated at 11:11 on September 14, 2020.