Future perspectives on sustainable tribology

This source preferred by Mark Hadfield and Ben Thomas

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Authors: Tzanakis, I., Hadfield, M., Thomas, B., Noya, S.M., Henshaw, I. and Austen, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20525/

Journal: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews

Volume: 16

Issue: 6

Pages: 4126-4140

ISSN: 1364-0321

DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2012.02.064

This paper highlights the future perspectives of sustainable tribology by examining the economic, environmental and social impact of three tribological case studies. One case study examines the sustainability and durability of micro-CHP systems looking the tribological phenomena generated within a scroll expander system. The scroll is the main part of a specific micro-CHP system and experiences wear and cavitation damage. The tribological optimization of the scroll expander improves the sustainability of the micro-CHP unit while it has a serious economic and environmental impact to the consumers and to the society in general. Another case study is focused on friction and wear performance of lifeboat launch slipways. The causes of high friction and wear during the RNLI's lifeboat launches along an inclined slipway are investigated with a view to reducing the environmental impact due to slipway panel wear and lubricant release into the marine environment. The project encompasses the sustainable design of slipway panels using design modifications based on tribological investigations to double their lifespan, while environmental and economic impact was significantly reduced by the use of biodegradable greases and water as lubricants. The final case study involves an investigation of recycled plastic materials to replace polyurethane used on skateboard wheels, scooters and similar applications. Polyurethane (PU) is difficult to recycle. With the dwindling resources and environmental problems facing the world today, recycling for both waste reduction and resource preservation has become an increasingly important aspect of sustainability. The tribological results showed that recycled polycarbonate plastic can effectively act as a substitute to polyurethane wheels. Moreover, sustainability considerations showing the environmental benefits of the use of recycled plastics over PU include reducing the CO 2 footprint by 50% and the energy consumed by 60%, among other benefits. These case studies emphasise the importance of sustainable tribology in our epoch showing that increased sustainability performance can be achieved through tribology to a significant extent in many cases, providing stability to our world and more viable long term growth to our societies. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All right reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Tzanakis, I., Hadfield, M., Thomas, B., Noya, S.M., Henshaw, I. and Austen, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20525/

Journal: RENEWABLE & SUSTAINABLE ENERGY REVIEWS

Volume: 16

Issue: 6

Pages: 4126-4140

ISSN: 1364-0321

DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2012.02.064

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 18, 2020.