Binocular coordination: Reading stereoscopic sentences in depth

This source preferred by Julie Kirkby

Authors: Schotter, E.R., Blythe, H.I., Kirkby, J.A., Rayner, K., Holliman, N.S. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20523/

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 7

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1932-6203

ISSN: 1932-6203

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Schotter, E.R., Blythe, H.I., Kirkby, J.A., Rayner, K., Holliman, N.S. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20523/

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 7

Issue: 4

Pages: e35608

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035608

The present study employs a stereoscopic manipulation to present sentences in three dimensions to subjects as they read for comprehension. Subjects read sentences with (a) no depth cues, (b) a monocular depth cue that implied the sentence loomed out of the screen (i.e., increasing retinal size), (c) congruent monocular and binocular (retinal disparity) depth cues (i.e., both implied the sentence loomed out of the screen) and (d) incongruent monocular and binocular depth cues (i.e., the monocular cue implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and the binocular cue implied it receded behind the screen). Reading efficiency was mostly unaffected, suggesting that reading in three dimensions is similar to reading in two dimensions. Importantly, fixation disparity was driven by retinal disparity; fixations were significantly more crossed as readers progressed through the sentence in the congruent condition and significantly more uncrossed in the incongruent condition. We conclude that disparity depth cues are used on-line to drive binocular coordination during reading.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Schotter, E.R., Blythe, H.I., Kirkby, J.A., Rayner, K., Holliman, N.S. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20523/

Journal: PLoS ONE

Volume: 7

Issue: 4

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035608

The present study employs a stereoscopic manipulation to present sentences in three dimensions to subjects as they read for comprehension. Subjects read sentences with (a) no depth cues, (b) a monocular depth cue that implied the sentence loomed out of the screen (i.e., increasing retinal size), (c) congruent monocular and binocular (retinal disparity) depth cues (i.e., both implied the sentence loomed out of the screen) and (d) incongruent monocular and binocular depth cues (i.e., the monocular cue implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and the binocular cue implied it receded behind the screen). Reading efficiency was mostly unaffected, suggesting that reading in three dimensions is similar to reading in two dimensions. Importantly, fixation disparity was driven by retinal disparity; fixations were significantly more crossed as readers progressed through the sentence in the congruent condition and significantly more uncrossed in the incongruent condition. We conclude that disparity depth cues are used on-line to drive binocular coordination during reading. © 2012 Schotter et al.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Schotter, E.R., Blythe, H.I., Kirkby, J.A., Rayner, K., Holliman, N.S. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20523/

Journal: PLOS ONE

Volume: 7

Issue: 4

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035608

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Schotter, E.R., Blythe, H.I., Kirkby, J.A., Rayner, K., Holliman, N.S. and Liversedge, S.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20523/

Journal: PloS one

Volume: 7

Issue: 4

Pages: e35608

eISSN: 1932-6203

The present study employs a stereoscopic manipulation to present sentences in three dimensions to subjects as they read for comprehension. Subjects read sentences with (a) no depth cues, (b) a monocular depth cue that implied the sentence loomed out of the screen (i.e., increasing retinal size), (c) congruent monocular and binocular (retinal disparity) depth cues (i.e., both implied the sentence loomed out of the screen) and (d) incongruent monocular and binocular depth cues (i.e., the monocular cue implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and the binocular cue implied it receded behind the screen). Reading efficiency was mostly unaffected, suggesting that reading in three dimensions is similar to reading in two dimensions. Importantly, fixation disparity was driven by retinal disparity; fixations were significantly more crossed as readers progressed through the sentence in the congruent condition and significantly more uncrossed in the incongruent condition. We conclude that disparity depth cues are used on-line to drive binocular coordination during reading.

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