Technobiophilia: Nature and human interactions in the digital age

Authors: Oe, H., Yamaoka, Y. and Weeks, M.

Journal: Cogent Arts and Humanities

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

eISSN: 2331-1983

DOI: 10.1080/23311983.2022.2068823

Abstract:

Today, people around the world have greatly increased opportunities to interact with people and nature in virtual cyberspace. and because of the recent unprecedented disaster of covid, we are becoming more and more active in cyberspace day by day, flexibly moving between real and virtual space, and interacting with people in digital space to the extent that not a day goes by without contact with nature. and experience has shown that this has resulted in an increased attachment to nature and interest in environmental issues. The UK author, Dr Sue Thomas, presented the concept of “techno-biophilia” in 2013, which has the potential to become an important guiding principle in global environmental protection and urban development. In this perspective paper, the potential and prospects of the concept of techno-biophilia are discussed from the perspective of human interaction with nature. Rather than considering digital and real space as opposites, the paper considers the meaning of studying the effects of human-nature interaction in the 21st century space where the real and virtual merge, in a new anthropological frame of reference, and contributes to further stimulating debate.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36859/

Source: Scopus

Technobiophilia: Nature and human interactions in the digital age

Authors: Oe, H., Yamaoka, Y. and Weeks, M.

Journal: COGENT ARTS & HUMANITIES

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

ISSN: 2331-1983

DOI: 10.1080/23311983.2022.2068823

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36859/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Technobiophilia: Nature and human interactions in the digital age

Authors: Oe, H., Yamaoka, Y. and Weeks, M.

Journal: Cogent Arts and Humanities

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Publisher: Cogent OA

ISSN: 2331-1983

DOI: 10.1080/23311983.2022.2068823

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36859/

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23311983.2022.2068823

Source: Manual

Technobiophilia: Nature and human interactions in the digital age

Authors: Oe, H., Yamaoka, Y. and Weeks, M.

Journal: Cogent Arts and Humanities

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Publisher: Cogent OA

ISSN: 2331-1983

Abstract:

The lockdown period during which people were restricted from leaving the house by COVID-19 greatly increased the opportunities for people around the world to interact with people and nature in virtual cyberspace. And this unprecedented experience has seen us become more active in cyberspace by the day, moving flexibly between reality and virtual space to the extent that not a day goes by when we are not in touch with nature and interacting with others in digital spaces. And we know from experience that the physical restrictions we have recently experienced with COVID have increased our engagement with nature in virtual space, which in turn has increased our attachment to nature and our concern for environmental issues. The UK author, Dr Sue Thomas, presented the concept of 'techno-biophilia' in 2013, which has the potential to become an important guiding principle in global environmental protection and urban development.

This viewpoint paper adds a discussion of the possibilities and prospects of the concept of techno-biophilia from the perspective of human interaction with nature. Rather than viewing digital and real space as opposites, it considers the implications of studying the effects of human-nature interactions in a 21st century space where the real and virtual merge in a new humanistic frame of reference and contributes to further stimulating debate.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36859/

Source: BURO EPrints