Biodeterioration and bioprotection of concrete assets in the coastal environment

Authors: Bone, J.R., Stafford, R., Hall, A.E. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation

Volume: 175

ISSN: 0964-8305

DOI: 10.1016/j.ibiod.2022.105507

Abstract:

The deleterious effects (biodeterioration) and the protective benefits (bioprotection) of biological colonisation on manmade structures have long been debated. Lichens, biofilms, algae, bivalves and gastropods contribute both directly and indirectly to damaging substrata in the coastal zone which can enhance abiotic erosive forces that exploit biologically induced superficial damage. There is mounting evidence that these same species may also provide protective benefits. This debate often impacts approaches to managing fouling on concrete assets in the coastal environment. The net benefit or detriment a species or assemblage has on a structure is spatially and temporally dynamic and subject to the influence of various abiotic and biotic factors at different scales. However, the net outcome may be more pronounced under different contexts, particularly under warming and ocean acidifying climate change scenarios which is where further research should focus. Additionally, as bioprotection represents a potentially valuable ecosystem service, it supports the argument for increasing and improving habitat availability and biodiversity on artificial coastal structures via ecological enhancement. Quantifying bioprotection in useful metrics, such as monetary value or time added to serviceable life, would help demonstrate the benefits of bioprotective species in a meaningful way. Outline:

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37662/

Source: Scopus

Biodeterioration and bioprotection of concrete assets in the coastal environment

Authors: Bone, J.R., Stafford, R., Hall, A.E. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: INTERNATIONAL BIODETERIORATION & BIODEGRADATION

Volume: 175

eISSN: 1879-0208

ISSN: 0964-8305

DOI: 10.1016/j.ibiod.2022.105507

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37662/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Biodeterioration and bioprotection of concrete assets in the coastal environment

Authors: Bone, J.R., Stafford, R., Hall, A.E. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation

Volume: 175

Issue: 105507

Pages: 1-13

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0964-8305

Abstract:

The deleterious effects (biodeterioration) and the protective benefits (bioprotection) of biological colonisation on manmade structures have long been debated. Lichens, biofilms, algae, bivalves and gastropods contribute both directly and indirectly to damaging substrata in the coastal zone which can enhance abiotic erosive forces that exploit biologically induced superficial damage. There is mounting evidence that these same species may also provide protective benefits. This debate often impacts approaches to managing fouling on concrete assets in the coastal environment. The net benefit or detriment a species or assemblage has on a structure is spatially and temporally dynamic and subject to the influence of various abiotic and biotic factors at different scales. However, the net outcome may be more pronounced under different contexts, particularly under warming and ocean acidifying climate change scenarios which is where further research should focus. Additionally, as bioprotection represents a potentially valuable ecosystem service, it supports the argument for increasing and improving habitat availability and biodiversity on artificial coastal structures via ecological enhancement. Quantifying bioprotection in useful metrics, such as monetary value or time added to serviceable life, would help demonstrate the benefits of bioprotective species in a meaningful way

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37662/

Source: Manual

Biodeterioration and bioprotection of concrete assets in the coastal environment

Authors: Bone, J.R., Stafford, R., Hall, A.E. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation

Volume: 175

Issue: 105507

Pages: 1-13

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0964-8305

Abstract:

The deleterious effects (biodeterioration) and the protective benefits (bioprotection) of biological colonisation on manmade structures have long been debated. Lichens, biofilms, algae, bivalves and gastropods contribute both directly and indirectly to damaging substrata in the coastal zone which can enhance abiotic erosive forces that exploit biologically induced superficial damage. There is mounting evidence that these same species may also provide protective benefits. This debate often impacts approaches to managing fouling on concrete assets in the coastal environment. The net benefit or detriment a species or assemblage has on a structure is spatially and temporally dynamic and subject to the influence of various abiotic and biotic factors at different scales. However, the net outcome may be more pronounced under different contexts, particularly under warming and ocean acidifying climate change scenarios which is where further research should focus. Additionally, as bioprotection represents a potentially valuable ecosystem service, it supports the argument for increasing and improving habitat availability and biodiversity on artificial coastal structures via ecological enhancement. Quantifying bioprotection in useful metrics, such as monetary value or time added to serviceable life, would help demonstrate the benefits of bioprotective species in a meaningful way

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37662/

Source: BURO EPrints