Chronic musculoskeletal pain rarely presents in a single body site: Results from a UK population study

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Carnes, D., Parsons, S., Ashby, D., Breen, A., Foster, N.E., Pincus, T., Vogel, S. and Underwood, M.

Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford)

Volume: 46

Issue: 7

Pages: 1168-1170

ISSN: 1462-0324

DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/kem118

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency and health impact of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain, in a representative UK sample. METHOD: Population postal questionnaire survey, using 16 general practices in the southeast of England, nationally representative urban/rural, ethnic and socioeconomic mix. A random selection of 4049 registered patients, aged 18 or over, were sent a questionnaire. The main outcome measures were chronic pain location, identified using a pain drawing; distress, pain intensity and disability as measured by the GHQ12 and the Chronic Pain Grade. RESULTS: A total of 2445 patients (60%) responded to the survey (44% male, mean age 52 yrs); 45% had chronic musculoskeletal pain. Of those with chronic pain, three quarters had pain in multiple sites (two or more sites). Variables significantly predicting this were: age under 55, [odds ratio (OR) 0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4, 0.6]; psychological distress (OR 1.8, CI at 95% 1.4, 2.2) and high pain intensity (OR 5.2, CI at 95% 4.1, 6.7). Only 33% of multi-site pain distributions conformed to the American College of Rheumatology definition of chronic widespread pain. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-site chronic pain is more common than single-site chronic pain and is commonly associated with other problems. Indiscriminate targeting of research and care for chronic musculoskeletal pain on single sites may often be inappropriate.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Carnes, D., Parsons, S., Ashby, D., Breen, A., Foster, N.E., Pincus, T., Vogel, S. and Underwood, M.

Journal: Rheumatology

Volume: 46

Issue: 7

Pages: 1168-1170

eISSN: 1462-0332

ISSN: 1462-0324

DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/kem118

Objective. To investigate the frequency and health impact of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain, in a representative UK sample. Method. Population postal questionnaire survey, using 16 general practices in the southeast of England, nationally representative urban/ rural, ethnic and socioeconomic mix. A random selection of 4049 registered patients, aged 18 or over, were sent a questionnaire. The main outcome measures were chronic pain location, identified using a pain drawing; distress, pain intensity and disability as measured by the GHQ12 and the Chronic Pain Grade. Results. A total of 2445 patients (60%) responded to the survey (44% male, mean age 52 yrs); 45% had chronic musculoskeletal pain. Of those with chronic pain, three quarters had pain in multiple sites (two or more sites). Variables significantly predicting this were: age under 55, [odds ratio (OR) 0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4, 0.6]; psychological distress (OR 1.8, CI at 95% 1.4, 2.2) and high pain intensity (OR 5.2, CI at 95% 4.1, 6.7). Only 33% of multi-site pain distributions conformed to the American College of Rheumatology definition of chronic widespread pain. Conclusions. Multi-site chronic pain is more common than single-site chronic pain and is commonly associated with other problems. Indiscriminate targeting of research and care for chronic musculoskeletal pain on single sites may often be inappropriate. © The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved.

This source preferred by Alan Breen

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Carnes, D., Parsons, S., Ashby, D., Breen, A., Foster, N.E., Pincus, T., Voge, S. and Underwood, M.

Journal: RHEUMATOLOGY

Volume: 46

Issue: 7

Pages: 1168-1170

ISSN: 1462-0324

DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/kem118

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Carnes, D., Parsons, S., Ashby, D., Breen, A., Foster, N.E., Pincus, T., Vogel, S. and Underwood, M.

Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

Volume: 46

Issue: 7

Pages: 1168-1170

eISSN: 1462-0332

ISSN: 1462-0324

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency and health impact of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain, in a representative UK sample. METHOD: Population postal questionnaire survey, using 16 general practices in the southeast of England, nationally representative urban/rural, ethnic and socioeconomic mix. A random selection of 4049 registered patients, aged 18 or over, were sent a questionnaire. The main outcome measures were chronic pain location, identified using a pain drawing; distress, pain intensity and disability as measured by the GHQ12 and the Chronic Pain Grade. RESULTS: A total of 2445 patients (60%) responded to the survey (44% male, mean age 52 yrs); 45% had chronic musculoskeletal pain. Of those with chronic pain, three quarters had pain in multiple sites (two or more sites). Variables significantly predicting this were: age under 55, [odds ratio (OR) 0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4, 0.6]; psychological distress (OR 1.8, CI at 95% 1.4, 2.2) and high pain intensity (OR 5.2, CI at 95% 4.1, 6.7). Only 33% of multi-site pain distributions conformed to the American College of Rheumatology definition of chronic widespread pain. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-site chronic pain is more common than single-site chronic pain and is commonly associated with other problems. Indiscriminate targeting of research and care for chronic musculoskeletal pain on single sites may often be inappropriate.

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