Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.729068

Abstract:

The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally. © 2013 Copyright The Experimental Psychology Society.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: Scopus

Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.729068

Abstract:

The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: PubMed

Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.729068

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Hebbian Learning for Olfactory Sequences

Authors: Johnson, A., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.729068

Abstract:

The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Andrew Johnson

Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.729068

Abstract:

The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Cauchi, L. and Miles, C.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 66

Issue: 6

Pages: 1082-1089

ISSN: 1747-0218

Abstract:

The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23761/

Source: BURO EPrints