The influence of word shading and word length on eye movements during reading

This source preferred by Julie Kirkby

Authors: Kirkby, J., Leyland, L., Juhasz, B.J., Pollatsek, A. and Liversedge, S.P.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Leyland, L.-A., Kirkby, J.A., Juhasz, B.J., Pollatsek, A. and Liversedge, S.P.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 66

Issue: 3

Pages: 471-486

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2011.599401

An interesting issue in reading is how parafoveal information affects saccadic targeting and fixation durations. We investigated the influence of shading selected regions of text on eye movements during reading of long and short words within sentences. A target word, either four- or eight-letters long, was presented in one of four shading conditions: the whole target word shaded; the first half shaded; second half shaded; no shading. There was no evidence of a visually mediated parafoveal-on-foveal effect. Saccadic targeting was modulated by the shading on the first half of the word, such that fixations landed closer to the beginning of the word than in the other three shading conditions. Furthermore, partial word shading, resulting in visual non-uniformity of the target word, produced longer gaze durations than the other conditions. Finally, readers spent more time re-reading target words when they were partially shaded than in the other two conditions. We suggest that our effects are due to targeting of the optimal viewing location and revisits to check words that appear visually unusual. Together, the results indicate robust effects of low-level visual characteristics of the word on oculomotor decisions of where and when to move the eyes during reading.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Leyland, L.A., Kirkby, J.A., Juhasz, B.J., Pollatsek, A. and Liversedge, S.P.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 66

Issue: 3

Pages: 471-486

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2011.599401

An interesting issue in reading is how parafoveal information affects saccadic targeting and fixation durations. We investigated the influence of shading selected regions of text on eye movements during reading of long and short words within sentences. A target word, either four- or eight-letters long, was presented in one of four shading conditions: the whole target word shaded; the first half shaded; second half shaded; no shading. There was no evidence of a visually mediated parafoveal-on-foveal effect. Saccadic targeting was modulated by the shading on the first half of the word, such that fixations landed closer to the beginning of the word than in the other three shading conditions. Furthermore, partial word shading, resulting in visual non-uniformity of the target word, produced longer gaze durations than the other conditions. Finally, readers spent more time re-reading target words when they were partially shaded than in the other two conditions. We suggest that our effects are due to targeting of the optimal viewing location and revisits to check words that appear visually unusual. Together, the results indicate robust effects of low-level visual characteristics of the word on oculomotor decisions of where and when to move the eyes during reading. © 2013 Copyright The Experimental Psychology Society.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Leyland, L.-A., Kirkby, J.A., Juhasz, B.J., Pollatsek, A. and Liversedge, S.P.

Journal: QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Volume: 66

Issue: 3

Pages: 471-486

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2011.599401

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Leyland, L.A., Kirkby, J.A., Juhasz, B.J., Pollatsek, A. and Liversedge, S.P.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Volume: 66

Issue: 3

Pages: 471-486

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

An interesting issue in reading is how parafoveal information affects saccadic targeting and fixation durations. We investigated the influence of shading selected regions of text on eye movements during reading of long and short words within sentences. A target word, either four- or eight-letters long, was presented in one of four shading conditions: the whole target word shaded; the first half shaded; second half shaded; no shading. There was no evidence of a visually mediated parafoveal-on-foveal effect. Saccadic targeting was modulated by the shading on the first half of the word, such that fixations landed closer to the beginning of the word than in the other three shading conditions. Furthermore, partial word shading, resulting in visual non-uniformity of the target word, produced longer gaze durations than the other conditions. Finally, readers spent more time re-reading target words when they were partially shaded than in the other two conditions. We suggest that our effects are due to targeting of the optimal viewing location and revisits to check words that appear visually unusual. Together, the results indicate robust effects of low-level visual characteristics of the word on oculomotor decisions of where and when to move the eyes during reading.

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