Chewing gum benefits sustained attention in the absence of task degradation

This source preferred by Andrew Johnson

Authors: Johnson, A., Muneem, M. and Miles, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23764/

Journal: Nutritional Neuroscience

Volume: 16

Issue: 4

Pages: 153-159

DOI: 10.1179/153/1476830512Y.0000000041

Objectives: The present study examined the effect of chewing gum on sustained attention and associated changes in subjective alertness.

Methods: In a within-participants design, 20 participants completed an extended version of the sustained attention response task (SART: Robertson et al., 1997), both with and without chewing gum. Self-rated measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were taken before and after the SART. Results: Chewing gum was associated with improved attentional task performance. This finding was not contingent upon a general decrease in attentional performance and was apparent at all stages of the task. Subjective measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were higher following the chewing of gum. Changes in sustained attention co-varied with subjective alertness Discussion: The effects of chewing gum on attention and alertness are consistent with past literature and were not contingent on declines in attention. Additionally, we found evidence that gum-induced changes in self-rated alertness and attention are related. We found no support for the proposition that chewing gum can impair attention due to the division of resources.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Muneem, M. and Miles, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23764/

Journal: Nutr Neurosci

Volume: 16

Issue: 4

Pages: 153-159

eISSN: 1476-8305

DOI: 10.1179/1476830512Y.0000000041

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the effect of chewing gum on sustained attention and associated changes in subjective alertness. METHODS: In a within-participants design, 20 participants completed an extended version of the sustained attention response task (SART: Robertson et al., 1997), both with and without chewing gum. Self-rated measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were taken before and after the SART. RESULTS: Chewing gum was associated with improved attentional task performance. This finding was not contingent upon a general decrease in attentional performance and was apparent at all stages of the task. Subjective measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were higher following the chewing of gum. Changes in sustained attention co-varied with subjective alertness. DISCUSSION: The effects of chewing gum on attention and alertness are consistent with past literature and were not contingent on declines in attention. Additionally, we found evidence that gum-induced changes in self-rated alertness and attention are related. We found no support for the proposition that chewing gum can impair attention due to the division of resources.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Muneem, M. and Miles, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23764/

Journal: Nutritional Neuroscience

Volume: 16

Issue: 4

Pages: 153-159

eISSN: 1476-8305

ISSN: 1028-415X

DOI: 10.1179/1476830512Y.0000000041

Objectives: The present study examined the effect of chewing gum on sustained attention and associated changes in subjective alertness. Methods: In a within-participants design, 20 participants completed an extended version of the sustained attention response task (SART: Robertson et al., 1997), both with and without chewing gum. Self-rated measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were taken before and after the SART. Results: Chewing gum was associated with improved attentional task performance. This finding was not contingent upon a general decrease in attentional performance and was apparent at all stages of the task. Subjective measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were higher following the chewing of gum. Changes in sustained attention co-varied with subjective alertness. Discussion: The effects of chewing gum on attention and alertness are consistent with past literature and were not contingent on declines in attention. Additionally, we found evidence that gum-induced changes in self-rated alertness and attention are related. We found no support for the proposition that chewing gum can impair attention due to the division of resources. © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2013.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Muneem, M. and Miles, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23764/

Journal: NUTRITIONAL NEUROSCIENCE

Volume: 16

Issue: 4

Pages: 153-159

eISSN: 1476-8305

ISSN: 1028-415X

DOI: 10.1179/1476830512Y.0000000041

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Johnson, A.J., Muneem, M. and Miles, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23764/

Journal: Nutritional neuroscience

Volume: 16

Issue: 4

Pages: 153-159

eISSN: 1476-8305

ISSN: 1028-415X

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the effect of chewing gum on sustained attention and associated changes in subjective alertness. METHODS: In a within-participants design, 20 participants completed an extended version of the sustained attention response task (SART: Robertson et al., 1997), both with and without chewing gum. Self-rated measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were taken before and after the SART. RESULTS: Chewing gum was associated with improved attentional task performance. This finding was not contingent upon a general decrease in attentional performance and was apparent at all stages of the task. Subjective measures of alertness, contentedness, and calmness were higher following the chewing of gum. Changes in sustained attention co-varied with subjective alertness. DISCUSSION: The effects of chewing gum on attention and alertness are consistent with past literature and were not contingent on declines in attention. Additionally, we found evidence that gum-induced changes in self-rated alertness and attention are related. We found no support for the proposition that chewing gum can impair attention due to the division of resources.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:20 on October 20, 2020.