Catering for health: A review

This source preferred by Heather Hartwell

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Symonds, C.

http://rsh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/125/3/113

Journal: Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 125

Pages: 113-116

ISSN: 1466-4240

DOI: 10.1177/146642400512500314

Food, nutrition and health are currently under scrutiny. British eating patterns have radically changed over the past few decades, with the emergence of a 'grazing', 'snacking' culture. Simultaneously, more food is eaten outside the home and therefore the nutritional composition of foods/meals provided by catering establishments is of increasing relevance to the diet overall. Consumers are aware of the need for a healthy lifestyle and are encouraged to follow improved eating habits to avoid 'diseases of affluence' such as coronary heart disease, obesity, diet-related cancer and type 2 diabetes. For both economic and health reasons caterers should be encouraged to provide healthy options; however, often misconceptions exist and gaps are evident in the nutritional knowledge of this profession. Training curricula require revision. With the right information, training and support caterers can play a vital role in improving the health of the population.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Symonds, C.

Journal: J R Soc Promot Health

Volume: 125

Issue: 3

Pages: 113-116

ISSN: 1466-4240

DOI: 10.1177/146642400512500314

Food, nutrition and health are currently under scrutiny. British eating patterns have radically changed over the past few decades, with the emergence of a 'grazing', 'snacking' culture. Simultaneously, more food is eaten outside the home and therefore the nutritional composition of foods/meals provided by catering establishments is of increasing relevance to the diet overall. Consumers are aware of the need for a healthy lifestyle and are encouraged to follow improved eating habits to avoid 'diseases of affluence' such as coronary heart disease, obesity, diet-related cancer and type 2 diabetes. For both economic and health reasons caterers should be encouraged to provide healthy options; however, often misconceptions exist and gaps are evident in the nutritional knowledge of this profession. Training curricula require revision. With the right information, training and support caterers can play a vital role in improving the health of the population.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Symonds, C.

Journal: Journal of The Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 125

Issue: 3

Pages: 113-116

ISSN: 1466-4240

DOI: 10.1177/146642400512500314

Food, nutrition and health are currently under scrutiny. British eating patterns have radically changed over the past few decades, with the emergence of a 'grazing', 'snacking' culture. Simultaneously, more food is eaten outside the home and therefore the nutritional composition of foods/meals provided by catering establishments is of increasing relevance to the diet overall. Consumers are aware of the need for a healthy lifestyle and are encouraged to follow improved eating habits to avoid 'diseases of affluence' such as coronary heart disease, obesity, diet-related cancer and type 2 diabetes. For both economic and health reasons caterers should be encouraged to provide healthy options; however, often misconceptions exist and gaps are evident in the nutritional knowledge of this profession. Training curricula require revision. With the right information, training and support caterers can play a vital role in improving the health of the population.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Symonds, C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF HEALTH

Volume: 125

Issue: 3

Pages: 113-116

ISSN: 1466-4240

DOI: 10.1177/146642400512500314

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Symonds, C.

Journal: The journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 125

Issue: 3

Pages: 113-116

eISSN: 1476-9042

ISSN: 1466-4240

Food, nutrition and health are currently under scrutiny. British eating patterns have radically changed over the past few decades, with the emergence of a 'grazing', 'snacking' culture. Simultaneously, more food is eaten outside the home and therefore the nutritional composition of foods/meals provided by catering establishments is of increasing relevance to the diet overall. Consumers are aware of the need for a healthy lifestyle and are encouraged to follow improved eating habits to avoid 'diseases of affluence' such as coronary heart disease, obesity, diet-related cancer and type 2 diabetes. For both economic and health reasons caterers should be encouraged to provide healthy options; however, often misconceptions exist and gaps are evident in the nutritional knowledge of this profession. Training curricula require revision. With the right information, training and support caterers can play a vital role in improving the health of the population.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.