Facilitating Goal-Oriented Behaviour in the Stroop Task: When Executive Control Is Influenced by Automatic Processing

This source preferred by Sarah Bate and Ben Parris

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Parris, B.A., Bate, S., Brown, S.D. and Hodgson, T.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20710/

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 7

Issue: 10

Pages: e46994

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046994

A portion of Stroop interference is thought to arise from a failure to maintain goal-oriented behaviour (or goal neglect). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether goal- relevant primes could enhance goal maintenance and reduce the Stroop interference effect. Here it is shown that primes related to the goal of responding quickly in the Stroop task (e.g. fast, quick, hurry) substantially reduced Stroop interference by reducing reaction times to incongruent trials but increasing reaction times to congruent and neutral trials. No effects of the primes were observed on errors. The effects on incongruent, congruent and neutral trials are explained in terms of the influence of the primes on goal maintenance. The results show that goal priming can facilitate goal-oriented behaviour and indicate that automatic processing can modulate executive control.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parris, B.A., Bate, S., Brown, S.D. and Hodgson, T.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20710/

Journal: PLoS ONE

Volume: 7

Issue: 10

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046994

A portion of Stroop interference is thought to arise from a failure to maintain goal-oriented behaviour (or goal neglect). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether goal- relevant primes could enhance goal maintenance and reduce the Stroop interference effect. Here it is shown that primes related to the goal of responding quickly in the Stroop task (e.g. fast, quick, hurry) substantially reduced Stroop interference by reducing reaction times to incongruent trials but increasing reaction times to congruent and neutral trials. No effects of the primes were observed on errors. The effects on incongruent, congruent and neutral trials are explained in terms of the influence of the primes on goal maintenance. The results show that goal priming can facilitate goal-oriented behaviour and indicate that automatic processing can modulate executive control. © 2012 Parris et al.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Parris, B.A., Bate, S., Brown, S.D. and Hodgson, T.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20710/

Journal: PLOS ONE

Volume: 7

Issue: 10

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046994

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Parris, B.A., Bate, S., Brown, S.D. and Hodgson, T.L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20710/

Journal: PloS one

Volume: 7

Issue: 10

Pages: e46994

eISSN: 1932-6203

A portion of Stroop interference is thought to arise from a failure to maintain goal-oriented behaviour (or goal neglect). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether goal- relevant primes could enhance goal maintenance and reduce the Stroop interference effect. Here it is shown that primes related to the goal of responding quickly in the Stroop task (e.g. fast, quick, hurry) substantially reduced Stroop interference by reducing reaction times to incongruent trials but increasing reaction times to congruent and neutral trials. No effects of the primes were observed on errors. The effects on incongruent, congruent and neutral trials are explained in terms of the influence of the primes on goal maintenance. The results show that goal priming can facilitate goal-oriented behaviour and indicate that automatic processing can modulate executive control.

The data on this page was last updated at 13:55 on February 25, 2020.