The perceived social impacts of the 2006 football world cup on munich residents

This source preferred by Ian Jones

Authors: Ohmann, S., Jones, I. and Wilkes, K.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/843/

Journal: Journal of Sport and Tourism

Volume: 11

Pages: 129-152

ISSN: 1477-5085

All major sporting events result in a variety of impacts upon the host community. To date, the majority of existing studies have focused upon the wider economic impacts, with few empirical studies of the social impacts upon local residents. This paper explores the perceived impacts of the 2006 Football World Cup upon residents of one of the host cities–Munich. Using a multi-stage sampling technique, 180 Munich residents were randomly selected. Of these, 132 agreed to participate in face-to-face interviews.

Findings from the study suggested that the impacts were largely perceived as positive by residents, especially in terms of urban regeneration, increased sense of security, positive fan behaviour and the general atmosphere surrounding the event. Negative impacts, such as increased crime, prostitution, and displacement of local residents were perceived by fewer respondents. Further analysis demonstrates that such perceptions are not dependent upon socio-demographic factors such as age, gender or length of residence in the city.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Ohmann, S., Jones, I. and Wilkes, K.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/843/

Journal: Journal of Sport and Tourism

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: 129-152

eISSN: 1029-5399

ISSN: 1477-5085

DOI: 10.1080/14775080601155167

All major sporting events result in a variety of impacts upon the host community. To date, the majority of existing studies have focused upon the wider economic impacts, with few empirical studies of the social impacts upon local residents. This paper explores the perceived impacts of the 2006 Football World Cup upon residents of one of the host cities–Munich. Using a multi-stage sampling technique, 180 Munich residents were randomly selected. Of these, 132 agreed to participate in face-to-face interviews. Findings from the study suggested that the impacts were largely perceived as positive by residents, especially in terms of urban regeneration, increased sense of security, positive fan behaviour and the general atmosphere surrounding the event. Negative impacts, such as increased crime, prostitution, and displacement of local residents were perceived by fewer respondents. Further analysis demonstrates that such perceptions are not dependent upon socio-demographic factors such as age, gender or length of residence in the city. © 2006 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:19 on April 6, 2020.