A sustainable product design model

This source preferred by Mark Hadfield

Authors: Hadfield, M. and Howarth, G.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TX5-4G7X99T-1&_user=1682380&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F2006&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000011378&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1682380&md5=2a7e3bb6da897c9ae4d1f1d95408a138

Journal: Materials and Design

Volume: 27

Issue: 10

Pages: 1128-1133

ISSN: 0261-3069

DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2005.03.016

There are major challenges for the designer to now include Sustainable Development aspects into his/her design; particularly related to the social and wider economic impacts. The designer must, more than ever before, take into consideration the views and concerns of all the ‘interested parties’ – stakeholders. There are many topics – issues and concerns to consider and often they can be conflicting. The need is to examine the Sustainable Development risks and benefits associated with any particular design so improvements can be made. Both a ‘concept’ model and a Bournemouth University practical model are described which allows this risk/benefit assessment to be made in a structured manner on a wide range of topics. The assessment can examine the product, the company manufacturing the product and the manufacturing site. The major social, economic and environmental risks and benefits is tabulated or presented graphically for ease of evaluation in order to modify the design and so improve the Sustainable Development aspects.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Howarth, G. and Hadfield, M.

Journal: Materials and Design

Volume: 27

Issue: 10

Pages: 1128-1133

eISSN: 1873-4197

ISSN: 0261-3069

DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2005.03.016

There are major challenges for the designer to now include Sustainable Development aspects into his/her design; particularly related to the social and wider economic impacts. The designer must, more than ever before, take into consideration the views and concerns of all the 'interested parties' - stakeholders. There are many topics - issues and concerns to consider and often they can be conflicting. The need is to examine the Sustainable Development risks and benefits associated with any particular design so improvements can be made. Both a 'concept' model and a Bournemouth University practical model are described which allows this risk/benefit assessment to be made in a structured manner on a wide range of topics. The assessment can examine the product, the company manufacturing the product and the manufacturing site. The major social, economic and environmental risks and benefits is tabulated or presented graphically for ease of evaluation in order to modify the design and so improve the Sustainable Development aspects. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Howarth, G. and Hadfield, M.

Journal: MATERIALS & DESIGN

Volume: 27

Issue: 10

Pages: 1128-1133

ISSN: 0261-3069

DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2005.03.016

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.