Evaluation of a primary care counselling service in Dorset

This source preferred by Roger Baker and Helen Allen

Authors: Baker, R., Allen, H., Gibson, S., Newth, J. and Baker, E.

Journal: British Journal of General Practice

Volume: 48

Pages: 1049-1053

ISSN: 0960-1643

BACKGROUND: Research into the effectiveness of counselling in primary care is rare. This study attempts to provide a thorough evaluation of the effects of a new counselling service introduced throughout Dorset. AIM: To evaluate the impact of counselling on client symptomatology, self-esteem, and quality of life. The effect of counselling on drug prescribing, referrals to other mental health professionals, and client and general practitioner (GP) satisfaction were also assessed. METHOD: All new clients referred for counselling were asked to complete and return questionnaires before and after counselling. A total of 385 clients took part in the study. The first and second assessments were compared statistically. Clients were ascribed a psychiatric diagnosis using a simplified version of DSM-IIIR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association). GPs' views of the service were determined using a specially designed questionnaire. Drug data were obtained from the Prescription Pricing Authority and referral statistics from Dorset HealthCare National Health Service (NHS) Trust. RESULTS: The number of psychiatric symptoms and their severity were significantly reduced by counselling. There were no significant differences in the prescription of anxiolytic/hypnotic and anti-depressant medication between matched practices with and without counsellors. The presence of a counsellor did not affect the rate of referral to other mental health professionals. Clients and GPs valued the service highly. CONCLUSIONS: The Psychology Managed Counselling Service is an effective method of running a counselling service and is well received by both clients and GPs. Counselled clients improved significantly on several measures.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Baker, R., Allen, H., Gibson, S., Newth, J. and Baker, E.

Journal: Br J Gen Pract

Volume: 48

Issue: 428

Pages: 1049-1053

ISSN: 0960-1643

BACKGROUND: Research into the effectiveness of counselling in primary care is rare. This study attempts to provide a thorough evaluation of the effects of a new counselling service introduced throughout Dorset. AIM: To evaluate the impact of counselling on client symptomatology, self-esteem, and quality of life. The effect of counselling on drug prescribing, referrals to other mental health professionals, and client and general practitioner (GP) satisfaction were also assessed. METHOD: All new clients referred for counselling were asked to complete and return questionnaires before and after counselling. A total of 385 clients took part in the study. The first and second assessments were compared statistically. Clients were ascribed a psychiatric diagnosis using a simplified version of DSM-IIIR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association). GPs' views of the service were determined using a specially designed questionnaire. Drug data were obtained from the Prescription Pricing Authority and referral statistics from Dorset HealthCare National Health Service (NHS) Trust. RESULTS: The number of psychiatric symptoms and their severity were significantly reduced by counselling. There were no significant differences in the prescription of anxiolytic/hypnotic and anti-depressant medication between matched practices with and without counsellors. The presence of a counsellor did not affect the rate of referral to other mental health professionals. Clients and GPs valued the service highly. CONCLUSIONS: The Psychology Managed Counselling Service is an effective method of running a counselling service and is well received by both clients and GPs. Counselled clients improved significantly on several measures.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Baker, R., Allen, H., Gibson, S., Newth, J. and Baker, E.

Journal: British Journal of General Practice

Volume: 48

Issue: 428

Pages: 1049-1053

ISSN: 0960-1643

Background. Research into the effectiveness of counselling in primary care is rare. This study attempts to provide a thorough evaluation of the effects of a new counselling service introduced throughout Dorset. Aim. To evaluate the impact of counselling on client symptomatology, self-esteem, and quality of life. The effect of counselling on drug prescribing, referrals to other mental health professionals, and client and general practitioner (GP) satisfaction were also assessed. Method. All new clients referred for counselling were asked to complete and return questionnaires before and after counselling. A total of 385 clients took part in the study. The first and second assessments were compared statistically. Clients were ascribed a psychiatric diagnosis using a simplified version of DSM-IIIR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association). GPs' views of the service were determined using a specially designed questionnaire. Drug data were obtained from the Prescription Pricing Authority and referral statistics from Dorset HealthCare National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Results. The number of psychiatric symptoms and their severity were significantly reduced by counselling. There were no significant differences in the prescription of anxiolytic/hypnotic and anti-depressant medication between matched practices with and without counsellors. The presence of a counsellor did not affect the rate of referral to other mental health professionals. Clients and GPs valued the service highly. Conclusions. The Psychology Managed Counselling Service is an effective method of running a counselling service and is well received by both clients and GPs. Counselled clients improved significantly on several measures.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Baker, R., Allen, H., Gibson, S., Newth, J. and Baker, E.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF GENERAL PRACTICE

Volume: 48

Issue: 428

Pages: 1049-1053

ISSN: 0960-1643

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Baker, R., Allen, H., Gibson, S., Newth, J. and Baker, E.

Journal: The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

Volume: 48

Issue: 428

Pages: 1049-1053

eISSN: 1478-5242

ISSN: 0960-1643

BACKGROUND: Research into the effectiveness of counselling in primary care is rare. This study attempts to provide a thorough evaluation of the effects of a new counselling service introduced throughout Dorset. AIM: To evaluate the impact of counselling on client symptomatology, self-esteem, and quality of life. The effect of counselling on drug prescribing, referrals to other mental health professionals, and client and general practitioner (GP) satisfaction were also assessed. METHOD: All new clients referred for counselling were asked to complete and return questionnaires before and after counselling. A total of 385 clients took part in the study. The first and second assessments were compared statistically. Clients were ascribed a psychiatric diagnosis using a simplified version of DSM-IIIR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association). GPs' views of the service were determined using a specially designed questionnaire. Drug data were obtained from the Prescription Pricing Authority and referral statistics from Dorset HealthCare National Health Service (NHS) Trust. RESULTS: The number of psychiatric symptoms and their severity were significantly reduced by counselling. There were no significant differences in the prescription of anxiolytic/hypnotic and anti-depressant medication between matched practices with and without counsellors. The presence of a counsellor did not affect the rate of referral to other mental health professionals. Clients and GPs valued the service highly. CONCLUSIONS: The Psychology Managed Counselling Service is an effective method of running a counselling service and is well received by both clients and GPs. Counselled clients improved significantly on several measures.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on November 21, 2018.