Exploring the expanded role of nurses in critical care

This source preferred by Clive Andrewes and Martin Hind

Authors: Hind, M., Jackson, D., Andrewes, C., Fulbrook, P., Galvin, K.T. and Frost, S.

Journal: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

Volume: 15

Pages: 147-153

ISSN: 0964-3397

DOI: 10.1016/S0964-3397(99)80045-7

This paper reports on a small research study that explored the perceptions of staff in an intensive/coronary/high-dependency care unit on the expanded role of nurses in critical care. The research was undertaken in two phases.

In the first phase, focus groups and interviews of nursing and medical staff were used asmethods to explore their perceptions. Data were analysed by thematic content analysis and generated four categories: specialized skills; maintaining competence; how far nurses can go; and training and education. Using verbatim examples from the participants, these categories are described. In summary, it was found that both doctors and nurses were in favour of nursing role developments, and for the nurses this was driven by their desire to meet the patients' needs.

In a smaller second phase, a questionnaire was developed based on information gained in thefirst phase. It was utilized to seek the views of all the nursing staff on specific role-expansion activities. Findings revealed substantial support for developing the role of critical care nurses in a number of activities: cannulation; venepuncture; ordering blood tests and X-rays; performing physiotherapy; inserting arterial lines; performing elective cardioversion; thrombolysis treatment and intubation.

This research study has yielded important information. However, it is recognized that, whilstthese roles may be new to this particular critical care unit, there are many other units where they may already be common practice. Whenever new roles are developed, it is important to evaluate their effectiveness in measurable terms and regular audit is advisable. Further research is therefore recommended on both the development and evaluation of new roles in critical care.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hind, M., Jackson, D., Andrewes, C., Fulbrook, P., Galvin, K. and Frost, S.

Journal: Intensive Crit Care Nurs

Volume: 15

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-153

ISSN: 0964-3397

This paper reports on a small research study that explored the perceptions of staff in an intensive/coronary/high-dependency care unit on the expanded role of nurses in critical care. The research was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase, focus groups and interviews of nursing and medical staff were used as methods to explore their perceptions. Data were analysed by thematic content analysis and generated four categories: specialized skills; maintaining competence; how far nurses can go; and training and education. Using verbatim examples from the participants, these categories are described. In summary, it was found that both doctors and nurses were in favour of nursing role developments, and for the nurses this was driven by their desire to meet the patients' needs. In a smaller second phase, a questionnaire was developed based on information gained in the first phase. It was utilized to seek the views of all the nursing staff on specific role-expansion activities. Findings revealed substantial support for developing the role of critical care nurses in a number of activities: cannulation; venepuncture; ordering blood tests and X-rays; performing physiotherapy; inserting arterial lines; performing elective cardioversion; thrombolysis treatment and intubation. This research study has yielded important information. However, it is recognized that, whilst these roles may be new to this particular critical care unit, there are many other units where they may already be common practice. Whenever new roles are developed, it is important to evaluate their effectiveness in measurable terms and regular audit is advisable. Further research is therefore recommended on both the development and evaluation of new roles in critical care.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hind, M., Jackson, D., Andrewes, C., Fulbrook, P., Galvin, K. and Frost, S.

Journal: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

Volume: 15

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-153

ISSN: 0964-3397

DOI: 10.1016/S0964-3397(99)80045-7

This paper reports on a small research study that explored the perceptions of staff in an intensive/coronary/high-dependency care unit on the expanded role of nurses in critical care. The research was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase, focus groups and interviews of nursing and medical staff were used as methods to explore their perceptions. Data were analysed by thematic content analysis and generated four categories: specialized skills; maintaining competence; how far nurses can go; and training and education. Using verbatim examples from the participants, these categories are described. In summary, it was found that both doctors and nurses were in favour of nursing role developments, and for the nurses this was driven by their desire to meet the patients' needs. In a smaller second phase, a questionnaire was developed based on information gained in the first phase. It was utilized to seek the views of all the nursing staff on specific role-expansion activities. Findings revealed substantial support for developing the role of critical care nurses in a number of activities: cannulation; venepuncture; ordering blood tests and X-rays; performing physiotherapy; inserting arterial lines; performing elective cardioversion; thrombolysis treatment and intubation. This research study has yielded important information. However, it is recognized that, whilst these roles may be new to this particular critical care unit, there are many other units where they may already be common practice. Whenever new roles are developed, it is important to evaluate their effectiveness in measurable terms and regular audit is advisable. Further research is therefore recommended on both the development and evaluation of new roles in critical care. © 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hind, M., Jackson, D., Andrewes, C., Fulbrook, P., Galvin, K. and Frost, S.

Journal: Intensive & critical care nursing

Volume: 15

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-153

eISSN: 1532-4036

ISSN: 0964-3397

This paper reports on a small research study that explored the perceptions of staff in an intensive/coronary/high-dependency care unit on the expanded role of nurses in critical care. The research was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase, focus groups and interviews of nursing and medical staff were used as methods to explore their perceptions. Data were analysed by thematic content analysis and generated four categories: specialized skills; maintaining competence; how far nurses can go; and training and education. Using verbatim examples from the participants, these categories are described. In summary, it was found that both doctors and nurses were in favour of nursing role developments, and for the nurses this was driven by their desire to meet the patients' needs. In a smaller second phase, a questionnaire was developed based on information gained in the first phase. It was utilized to seek the views of all the nursing staff on specific role-expansion activities. Findings revealed substantial support for developing the role of critical care nurses in a number of activities: cannulation; venepuncture; ordering blood tests and X-rays; performing physiotherapy; inserting arterial lines; performing elective cardioversion; thrombolysis treatment and intubation. This research study has yielded important information. However, it is recognized that, whilst these roles may be new to this particular critical care unit, there are many other units where they may already be common practice. Whenever new roles are developed, it is important to evaluate their effectiveness in measurable terms and regular audit is advisable. Further research is therefore recommended on both the development and evaluation of new roles in critical care.

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