Child, adolescent and youth suicide and undetermined deaths in England and Wales compared with Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the USA for the 1974-1999 period.

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Volume: 17

Pages: 239-253

ISSN: 0334-0139

Successive British Governments have aimed to reduce suicide, especially amongst younger people. Using WHO standardised data for the age bands "child" (5-14 years) and "adolescent and youth" (15-24 years) suicide rates for England and Wales were compared with the other major Western countries with end-points being average of 1974-1976 and average 1997-1999, by gender. "Undetermined deaths" were also analysed to consider any "hidden suicides". Over the period there was little change in child suicide for both genders in any country. Female "adolescent and youth" suicide rates fell in most countries, in contrast to male "adolescent and youth" rates, which rose substantially in six countries, including England & Wales. With the exception of Spain, there was little statistical significant difference between female Anglo-Welsh rates and the other countries. Apart from Spain and Australia, Anglo-Welsh youth rates were significantly worse than Canada, France, Germany and Japan. "Undetermined" deaths showed marked variation across many countries, but Anglo-Welsh rates were up substantially for both males and females [116% and 83%, respectively], whilst falling substantially in six countries. Child suicide continues to be a statistical rarity with little change in either suicide or "undetermined" deaths over the period. The dichotomy between male and female young people's suicide is a matter of concern, as the improvements in female rates are not matched in the male rates--the majority of which rose substantially. The "undetermined deaths" results continue to be problematic, especially regarding the substantial rises in England and Wales. Country-specific research is required to determine, why Anglo-Welsh adolescent and youth rates have deteriorated relative to other countries.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: Int J Adolesc Med Health

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 239-253

ISSN: 0334-0139

Successive British Governments have aimed to reduce suicide, especially amongst younger people. Using WHO standardised data for the age bands "child" (5-14 years) and "adolescent and youth" (15-24 years) suicide rates for England and Wales were compared with the other major Western countries with end-points being average of 1974-1976 and average 1997-1999, by gender. "Undetermined deaths" were also analysed to consider any "hidden suicides". Over the period there was little change in child suicide for both genders in any country. Female "adolescent and youth" suicide rates fell in most countries, in contrast to male "adolescent and youth" rates, which rose substantially in six countries, including England & Wales. With the exception of Spain, there was little statistical significant difference between female Anglo-Welsh rates and the other countries. Apart from Spain and Australia, Anglo-Welsh youth rates were significantly worse than Canada, France, Germany and Japan. "Undetermined" deaths showed marked variation across many countries, but Anglo-Welsh rates were up substantially for both males and females [116% and 83%, respectively], whilst falling substantially in six countries. Child suicide continues to be a statistical rarity with little change in either suicide or "undetermined" deaths over the period. The dichotomy between male and female young people's suicide is a matter of concern, as the improvements in female rates are not matched in the male rates--the majority of which rose substantially. The "undetermined deaths" results continue to be problematic, especially regarding the substantial rises in England and Wales. Country-specific research is required to determine, why Anglo-Welsh adolescent and youth rates have deteriorated relative to other countries.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 239-253

ISSN: 0334-0139

DOI: 10.1515/IJAMH.2005.17.3.239

Successive British Governments have aimed to reduce suicide, especially amongst younger people. Using WHO standardised data for the age bands "child" (5-14 years) and "adolescent and youth" (15-24 years) suicide rates for England and Wales were compared with the other major Western countries with end-points being average of 1974-1976 and average 1997-1999, by gender. "Undetermined deaths" were also analysed to consider any "hidden suicides". Over the period there was little change in child suicide for both genders in any country. Female "adolescent and youth" suicide rates fell in most countries, in contrast to male "adolescent and youth" rates, which rose substantially in six countries, including England & Wales. With the exception of Spain, there was little statistical significant difference between female Anglo-Welsh rates and the other countries. Apart from Spain and Australia, Anglo-Welsh youth rates were significantly worse than Canada, France, Germany and Japan. "Undetermined" deaths showed marked variation across many countries, but Anglo-Welsh rates were up substantially for both males and females [116% and 83%, respectively], whilst falling substantially in six countries. Child suicide continues to be a statistical rarity with little change in either suicide or "undetermined" deaths over the period. The dichotomy between male and female young people's suicide is a matter of concern, as the improvements in female rates are not matched in the male rates - the majority of which rose substantially. The "undetermined deaths" results continue to be problematic, especially regarding the substantial rises in England and Wales. Country-specific research is required to determine, why Anglo-Welsh adolescent and youth rates have deteriorated relative to other countries. ©Freund Publishing House Ltd.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: International journal of adolescent medicine and health

Volume: 17

Issue: 3

Pages: 239-253

ISSN: 0334-0139

Successive British Governments have aimed to reduce suicide, especially amongst younger people. Using WHO standardised data for the age bands "child" (5-14 years) and "adolescent and youth" (15-24 years) suicide rates for England and Wales were compared with the other major Western countries with end-points being average of 1974-1976 and average 1997-1999, by gender. "Undetermined deaths" were also analysed to consider any "hidden suicides". Over the period there was little change in child suicide for both genders in any country. Female "adolescent and youth" suicide rates fell in most countries, in contrast to male "adolescent and youth" rates, which rose substantially in six countries, including England & Wales. With the exception of Spain, there was little statistical significant difference between female Anglo-Welsh rates and the other countries. Apart from Spain and Australia, Anglo-Welsh youth rates were significantly worse than Canada, France, Germany and Japan. "Undetermined" deaths showed marked variation across many countries, but Anglo-Welsh rates were up substantially for both males and females [116% and 83%, respectively], whilst falling substantially in six countries. Child suicide continues to be a statistical rarity with little change in either suicide or "undetermined" deaths over the period. The dichotomy between male and female young people's suicide is a matter of concern, as the improvements in female rates are not matched in the male rates--the majority of which rose substantially. The "undetermined deaths" results continue to be problematic, especially regarding the substantial rises in England and Wales. Country-specific research is required to determine, why Anglo-Welsh adolescent and youth rates have deteriorated relative to other countries.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on February 18, 2019.