Comparison of suicide in people aged 65-74 and 75+ by gender in England and Wales and the major Western countries 1979-1999

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

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Journal: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Volume: 20

Pages: 17-25

ISSN: 0885-6230

DOI: 10.1002/gps.1213

Background The factors most strongly associated with suicide are age and gender—more men than women, and, more people over 65 kill themselves. As a number of Governments have targets to reduce suicide levels we compare elderly suicide rates over a 20-year period in England and Wales. And the major Western countries focusing upon age and gender. Method WHO mortality data were used to calculate three-year average General Population Suicide Rates (GPSR) for 1979–1981 to 1997–1999 and rates of people aged 65–74 and 75+ suicide by gender to provide ratios of change and a statistical comparison of England and Wales and the Major Western countries over the period. Results Male GSPR: ‘65–74’ suicide ratios fell significantly in six countries and in three for the ‘75+’. Female GSPR: ‘65–74’ suicide ratios fell in every country except Spain. Proportionately, there were more suicides in the over 65s in countries with an ‘extended family’ tradition, Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Japan, than in the five ‘secular’ countries. England and Wales male ‘65–74’ suicide fell significantly more than Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Netherlands and the USA, and did significantly better than the other countries for all female senior citizen suicides. Conclusion Suicide of the over-65s has improved in seven countries, especially in England and Wales, who had the greatest proportional reduction, which reflects well upon the psycho-geriatric and community services. However, in all countries, male 65–74 rates did not match the female out so extra efforts are needed to improve male rates. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-25

ISSN: 0885-6230

DOI: 10.1002/gps.1213

BACKGROUND: The factors most strongly associated with suicide are age and gender--more men than women, and, more people over 65 kill themselves. As a number of Governments have targets to reduce suicide levels we compare elderly suicide rates over a 20-year period in England and Wales. And the major Western countries focusing upon age and gender. METHOD: WHO mortality data were used to calculate three-year average General Population Suicide Rates (GPSR) for 1979-1981 to 1997-1999 and rates of people aged 65-74 and 75+ suicide by gender to provide ratios of change and a statistical comparison of England and Wales and the Major Western countries over the period. RESULTS: Male GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell significantly in six countries and in three for the '75+'. Female GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell in every country except Spain. Proportionately, there were more suicides in the over 65s in countries with an 'extended family' tradition, Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Japan, than in the five 'secular' countries. England and Wales male '65-74' suicide fell significantly more than Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Netherlands and the USA, and did significantly better than the other countries for all female senior citizen suicides. CONCLUSION: Suicide of the over-65s has improved in seven countries, especially in England and Wales, who had the greatest proportional reduction, which reflects well upon the psycho-geriatric and community services. However, in all countries, male 65-74 rates did not match the female out so extra efforts are needed to improve male rates.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-25

ISSN: 0885-6230

DOI: 10.1002/gps.1213

Background. The factors most strongly associated with suicide are age and gender - more men than women, and, more more people over 65 kill themselves. As a number of Governments have targets to reduce suicide levels we compare elderly suicide rates over a 20-year period in England and Wales. And the major Western countries focusing upon age and gender. Method. WHO mortality data were used to calculate three-year average General Population Suicide Rates (GPSR) for 1979-1981 to 1997-1999 and rates of people aged 65-74 and 75+ suicide by gender to provide ratios of change and a statistical comparison of England and Wales and the Major Western countries over the period. Results. Male GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell significantly in six countries and in three for the '75+'. Female GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell in every country except Spain. Proportionately, there were more suicides in the over 65s in countries with an 'extended family' tradition, Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Japan, than in the five 'secular' countries. England and Wales male '65-74' suicide fell significantly more than Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Netherlands and the USA, and did significantly better than the other countries for all female senior citizen suicides. Conclusion. Suicide of the over-65s has improved in seven countries, especially in England and Wales, who had the greatest proportional reduction, which reflects well upon the psycho-geriatric and community services. However, in all countries, male 65-74 rates did not match the female out so extra efforts are needed to improve male rates. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-25

ISSN: 0885-6230

DOI: 10.1002/gps.1213

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pritchard, C. and Hansen, L.

Journal: International journal of geriatric psychiatry

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 17-25

eISSN: 1099-1166

ISSN: 0885-6230

BACKGROUND: The factors most strongly associated with suicide are age and gender--more men than women, and, more people over 65 kill themselves. As a number of Governments have targets to reduce suicide levels we compare elderly suicide rates over a 20-year period in England and Wales. And the major Western countries focusing upon age and gender. METHOD: WHO mortality data were used to calculate three-year average General Population Suicide Rates (GPSR) for 1979-1981 to 1997-1999 and rates of people aged 65-74 and 75+ suicide by gender to provide ratios of change and a statistical comparison of England and Wales and the Major Western countries over the period. RESULTS: Male GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell significantly in six countries and in three for the '75+'. Female GSPR: '65-74' suicide ratios fell in every country except Spain. Proportionately, there were more suicides in the over 65s in countries with an 'extended family' tradition, Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Japan, than in the five 'secular' countries. England and Wales male '65-74' suicide fell significantly more than Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Netherlands and the USA, and did significantly better than the other countries for all female senior citizen suicides. CONCLUSION: Suicide of the over-65s has improved in seven countries, especially in England and Wales, who had the greatest proportional reduction, which reflects well upon the psycho-geriatric and community services. However, in all countries, male 65-74 rates did not match the female out so extra efforts are needed to improve male rates.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:54 on April 18, 2019.