Psycho-socio-economic outcomes in acoustic neuroma patients and their carers related to tumour size

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C., Clapham, L., Davis, A., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

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Journal: Clinical Otolaryngology & Allied Sciences

Volume: 29

Pages: 324-330

ISSN: 0307-7772

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2273.2004.00822.x

The objective was to explore psycho-socio-economic outcomes of a 2-year cohort of patients having surgery for an acoustic neuroma, and carers and their relationship to tumour size after surgery. The Wessex Patient Carer Questionnaire was designed in conjunction with Patients and Carers, to determine psycho-socio-economic outcomes. The results were juxtaposed against clinical profiles. The House–Brackman (HB) scale was used to assess facial function at 6 and 12 months after operation. The cohort contained 102 patients. There were 87% effective responders. Half were aged below 54 years and 30% had school-aged children. The majority (93%) of patients were operated via the translabyrinthine approach. Patients with large tumours, i.e. greater than 3 cm (28%), had most post-treatment physical problems, including hearing and balance difficulties, and 42% reported difficulty eating in public. Thirty-four per cent felt ‘stressed’ and 18%‘depressed’. After 6 months, facial function was recorded as HB scale 5/6 in 21% of patients but by 1 year only 8% of patients were HB 5/6. Patients and carers were generally very satisfied with their in-patient neurosurgical care, but significantly dissatisfied with post-discharge care – particularly the shortcoming of the community services. The majority of families felt ‘unsupported’ and only 20% of patients had confidence in their General Practitioner's knowledge. Families faced severe socio-economic disruption and patients’‘time-off-work’ was estimated to cost £954 000. Carers carried considerable post-discharge psychological burdens and costs to the public purse were calculated to be £52 400. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Clapham, L., Davis, A., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci

Volume: 29

Issue: 4

Pages: 324-330

ISSN: 0307-7772

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2273.2004.00822.x

The objective was to explore psycho-socio-economic outcomes of a 2-year cohort of patients having surgery for an acoustic neuroma, and carers and their relationship to tumour size after surgery. The Wessex Patient Carer Questionnaire was designed in conjunction with Patients and Carers, to determine psycho-socio-economic outcomes. The results were juxtaposed against clinical profiles. The House-Brackman (HB) scale was used to assess facial function at 6 and 12 months after operation. The cohort contained 102 patients. There were 87% effective responders. Half were aged below 54 years and 30% had school-aged children. The majority (93%) of patients were operated via the translabyrinthine approach. Patients with large tumours, i.e. greater than 3 cm (28%), had most post-treatment physical problems, including hearing and balance difficulties, and 42% reported difficulty eating in public. Thirty-four per cent felt 'stressed' and 18%'depressed'. After 6 months, facial function was recorded as HB scale 5/6 in 21% of patients but by 1 year only 8% of patients were HB 5/6. Patients and carers were generally very satisfied with their in-patient neurosurgical care, but significantly dissatisfied with post-discharge care - particularly the shortcoming of the community services. The majority of families felt 'unsupported' and only 20% of patients had confidence in their General Practitioner's knowledge. Families faced severe socio-economic disruption and patients"time-off-work' was estimated to cost pound 954,000. Carers carried considerable post-discharge psychological burdens and costs to the public purse were calculated to be pound 52,000.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Clapham, L., Davis, A., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences

Volume: 29

Issue: 4

Pages: 324-330

ISSN: 0307-7772

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2273.2004.00822.x

The objective was to explore psycho-socio-economic outcomes of a 2-year cohort of patients having surgery for an acoustic neuroma, and carers and their relationship to tumour size after surgery. The Wessex Patient Carer Questionnaire was designed in conjunction with Patients and Carers, to determine psycho-socio-economic outcomes. The results were juxtaposed against clinical profiles. The House-Brackman (HB) scale was used to assess facial function at 6 and 12 months after operation. The cohort contained 102 patients. There were 87% effective responders. Half were aged below 54 years and 30% had school-aged children. The majority (93%) of patients were operated via the translabyrinthine approach. Patients with large tumours, i.e. greater than 3 cm (28%), had most post-treatment physical problems, including hearing and balance difficulties, and 42% reported difficulty eating in public. Thirty-four per cent felt 'stressed' and 18% 'depressed'. After 6 months, facial function was recorded as HB scale 5/6 in 21% of patients but by 1 year only 8% of patients were HB 5/6. Patients and carers were generally very satisfied with their in-patient neurosurgical care, but significantly dissatisfied with post-discharge care - particularly the shortcoming of the community services. The majority of families felt 'unsupported' and only 20% of patients had confidence in their General Practitioner's knowledge. Families faced severe socio-economic disruption and patients' 'time-off-work' was estimated to cost £954 000. Carers carried considerable post-discharge psychological burdens and costs to the public purse were calculated to be £52 400.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pritchard, C., Clapham, L., Davis, A., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: CLINICAL OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Volume: 29

Issue: 4

Pages: 324-330

ISSN: 0307-7772

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2273.2004.00822.x

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Clapham, L., Davis, A., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: Clinical otolaryngology and allied sciences

Volume: 29

Issue: 4

Pages: 324-330

eISSN: 1365-2273

ISSN: 0307-7772

The objective was to explore psycho-socio-economic outcomes of a 2-year cohort of patients having surgery for an acoustic neuroma, and carers and their relationship to tumour size after surgery. The Wessex Patient Carer Questionnaire was designed in conjunction with Patients and Carers, to determine psycho-socio-economic outcomes. The results were juxtaposed against clinical profiles. The House-Brackman (HB) scale was used to assess facial function at 6 and 12 months after operation. The cohort contained 102 patients. There were 87% effective responders. Half were aged below 54 years and 30% had school-aged children. The majority (93%) of patients were operated via the translabyrinthine approach. Patients with large tumours, i.e. greater than 3 cm (28%), had most post-treatment physical problems, including hearing and balance difficulties, and 42% reported difficulty eating in public. Thirty-four per cent felt 'stressed' and 18%'depressed'. After 6 months, facial function was recorded as HB scale 5/6 in 21% of patients but by 1 year only 8% of patients were HB 5/6. Patients and carers were generally very satisfied with their in-patient neurosurgical care, but significantly dissatisfied with post-discharge care - particularly the shortcoming of the community services. The majority of families felt 'unsupported' and only 20% of patients had confidence in their General Practitioner's knowledge. Families faced severe socio-economic disruption and patients"time-off-work' was estimated to cost pound 954,000. Carers carried considerable post-discharge psychological burdens and costs to the public purse were calculated to be pound 52,000.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:52 on April 23, 2019.