Two-year prospective study of psychosocial outcomes and a cost-analysis of 'treatment-as-usual' versus an 'enhanced' (specialist liaison nurse) service for aneurysmal sub arachnoid haemorrhage (ASAH) patients and families

This source preferred by Colin Pritchard

Authors: Pritchard, C., Foulkes, L.M., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

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Journal: British Journal of Neurosurgery

Volume: 18

Pages: 347-356

ISSN: 0268-8697

DOI: 10.1080/0268869040004993

An 18-month retrospective study of 'treatment-as-usual' of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (ASAH, n  = 142) used as control to compare prospective study ( n  = 184) of an 'enhanced' ('Specialist Liaison Nurse'--SLN) service to reduce psychosocial trauma. Consultant notes, Glasgow Coma Scores and 'High Risk' bleeds scores provided clinical data. A standardized patient/carer designed questionnaire provided psychosocial data, plus a cost-analysis. The cohorts were good clinical and social matches. Sixty-five per cent of patients had 'high risk' bleeds, and 81% were Grade 1 and 2 on the GCS, 54% aged less than 55 years, 83% belonged to social classes 1 - 3 and 32% had school-aged children. Satisfaction with SLN inpatient and discharge care increased significantly, with reduced psychosocial trauma. The SLN produced net 'savings' of £155,000 p.a., from reduced time-off work, medical time and re-admissions. Prospectively, £1.6 + million annual 'savings' were identified on 80% of employed patients returning to work. Long-term dysfunctional stress is not inevitable for most ASAH patients as a SLN is clinically and fiscally cost-effective. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Foulkes, L., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: Br J Neurosurg

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Pages: 347-356

ISSN: 0268-8697

An 18-month retrospective study of 'treatment-as-usual' of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (ASAH, n = 142) used as control to compare prospective study (n = 184) of an 'enhanced' ('Specialist Liaison Nurse'-SLN) service to reduce psychosocial trauma. Consultant notes, Glasgow Coma Scores and 'High Risk' bleeds scores provided clinical data. A standardized patient/carer designed questionnaire provided psychosocial data, plus a cost-analysis. The cohorts were good clinical and social matches. Sixty-five per cent of patients had 'high risk' bleeds, and 81% were Grade 1 and 2 on the GCS, 54% aged less than 55 years, 83% belonged to social classes 1-3 and 32% had school-aged children. Satisfaction with SLN inpatient and discharge care increased significantly, with reduced psychosocial trauma. The SLN produced net 'savings' of pounds sterling 155,000 p.a., from reduced time-off work, medical time and re-admissions. Prospectively, pounds sterling 1.6 + million annual 'savings' were identified on 80% of employed patients returning to work. Long-term dysfunctional stress is not inevitable for most ASAH patients as a SLN is clinically and fiscally cost-effective.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Foulkes, L., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: British Journal of Neurosurgery

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Pages: 347-356

ISSN: 0268-8697

DOI: 10.1080/02688690400004993

An 18-month retrospective study of 'treatment-as-usual' of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (ASAH, n=142) used as control to compare prospective study (n=184) of an 'enhanced' ('Specialist Liaison Nurse'-SLN) service to reduce psychosocial trauma. Consultant notes, Glasgow Coma Scores and 'High Risk' bleeds scores provided clinical data. A standardized patient/carer designed questionnaire provided psychosocial data, plus a cost-analysis. The cohorts were good clinical and social matches. Sixty-five per cent of patients had 'high risk' bleeds, and 81% were Grade 1 and 2 on the GCS, 54% aged less than 55 years, 83% belonged to social classes 1-3 and 32% had school-aged children. Satisfaction with SLN inpatient and discharge care increased significantly, with reduced psychosocial trauma. The SLN produced net 'savings' of £155,000 p.a., from reduced time-off work, medical time and re-admissions. Prospectively, £1.6+ million annual 'savings' were identified on 80% of employed patients returning to work. Long-term dysfunctional stress is not inevitable for most ASAH patients as a SLN is clinically and fiscally cost-effective.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pritchard, C., Foulkes, L., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Pages: 347-356

eISSN: 1360-046X

ISSN: 0268-8697

DOI: 10.1080/02688690400004993

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pritchard, C., Foulkes, L., Lang, D.A. and Neil-Dwyer, G.

Journal: British journal of neurosurgery

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Pages: 347-356

eISSN: 1360-046X

ISSN: 0268-8697

An 18-month retrospective study of 'treatment-as-usual' of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (ASAH, n = 142) used as control to compare prospective study (n = 184) of an 'enhanced' ('Specialist Liaison Nurse'-SLN) service to reduce psychosocial trauma. Consultant notes, Glasgow Coma Scores and 'High Risk' bleeds scores provided clinical data. A standardized patient/carer designed questionnaire provided psychosocial data, plus a cost-analysis. The cohorts were good clinical and social matches. Sixty-five per cent of patients had 'high risk' bleeds, and 81% were Grade 1 and 2 on the GCS, 54% aged less than 55 years, 83% belonged to social classes 1-3 and 32% had school-aged children. Satisfaction with SLN inpatient and discharge care increased significantly, with reduced psychosocial trauma. The SLN produced net 'savings' of pounds sterling 155,000 p.a., from reduced time-off work, medical time and re-admissions. Prospectively, pounds sterling 1.6 + million annual 'savings' were identified on 80% of employed patients returning to work. Long-term dysfunctional stress is not inevitable for most ASAH patients as a SLN is clinically and fiscally cost-effective.

The data on this page was last updated at 10:28 on April 24, 2019.