Social Security and Care After Socialism: Reconfigurations of public and private

This source preferred by Rosie Read

Authors: Read, R. and Thelen, T.

http://docserver.ingentaconnect.com/deliver/connect/berghahn/09201297/v2007n50/s2.pdf?expires=1219863298&id=45688272&titleid=75002108&accname=Bournemouth+University&checksum=FDFEBCB1756806931FB6B00D79E9F18A

Journal: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology

Volume: 50

Pages: 3-18

ISSN: 0920-1297

DOI: 10.3167/foc.2007.500102

State frameworks for welfare and social security have been subject to processes of privatization, decentralization, and neoliberal reform in many parts of the world. This article explores how these developments might be theorized using anthropological understandings of social security in combination with feminist perspectives on care. In its application to post-1989 socioeconomic transformation in the former socialist region, this perspective overcomes the conceptual inadequacies of the "state withdrawal" model. It also illuminates the nuanced ways in which public and private (as spaces, subjectivities, institutions, moralities, and practices) re-emerge and change in the socialist era as well as today, continually shaping the trajectories and outcomes of reforms to care and social security.

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