Development of an emotional processing scale

This source preferred by Peter Thomas, Roger Baker and Sarah Thomas

Authors: Baker, R., Thomas, S., Thomas, P. and Owens, M.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.09.005

Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Volume: 62

Pages: 167-178

ISSN: 0022-3999

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.09.005

Objective The objective of this study was to report on the development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an emotional processing scale, a 38-item self-report questionnaire designed to identify emotional processing styles and deficits.

Methods An initial item pool derived from a conceptual model and clinical observations was piloted on clinical and community samples (n=150). The resulting 45-item scale was administered to patients with psychological problems, psychosomatic disorders, and physical disease, and to healthy individuals (n=460). Exploratory factor analysis was used to explore the underlying factor structure.

Results Maximum likelihood factor analysis yielded an eight-factor solution relating to styles of emotional experience (Lack of Attunement, Discordant, and Externalized), mechanisms controlling the experience and expression of emotions (Suppression, Dissociation, Avoidance, and Uncontrolled), and signs of inadequate processing (Intrusion). Internal reliability was moderate to high for six of eight factors. Preliminary findings suggested satisfactory convergent validity.

Discussion Overall, the psychometric properties of this scale appear promising. Work is in progress to refine the scale by incorporating additional items and by conducting further psychometric evaluations on new samples.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Baker, R., Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W. and Owens, M.

Journal: J Psychosom Res

Volume: 62

Issue: 2

Pages: 167-178

ISSN: 0022-3999

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.09.005

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to report on the development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an emotional processing scale, a 38-item self-report questionnaire designed to identify emotional processing styles and deficits. METHODS: An initial item pool derived from a conceptual model and clinical observations was piloted on clinical and community samples (n=150). The resulting 45-item scale was administered to patients with psychological problems, psychosomatic disorders, and physical disease, and to healthy individuals (n=460). Exploratory factor analysis was used to explore the underlying factor structure. RESULTS: Maximum likelihood factor analysis yielded an eight-factor solution relating to styles of emotional experience (Lack of Attunement, Discordant, and Externalized), mechanisms controlling the experience and expression of emotions (Suppression, Dissociation, Avoidance, and Uncontrolled), and signs of inadequate processing (Intrusion). Internal reliability was moderate to high for six of eight factors. Preliminary findings suggested satisfactory convergent validity. DISCUSSION: Overall, the psychometric properties of this scale appear promising. Work is in progress to refine the scale by incorporating additional items and by conducting further psychometric evaluations on new samples.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Baker, R., Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W. and Owens, M.

Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Volume: 62

Issue: 2

Pages: 167-178

ISSN: 0022-3999

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.09.005

Objective: The objective of this study was to report on the development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an emotional processing scale, a 38-item self-report questionnaire designed to identify emotional processing styles and deficits. Methods: An initial item pool derived from a conceptual model and clinical observations was piloted on clinical and community samples (n=150). The resulting 45-item scale was administered to patients with psychological problems, psychosomatic disorders, and physical disease, and to healthy individuals (n=460). Exploratory factor analysis was used to explore the underlying factor structure. Results: Maximum likelihood factor analysis yielded an eight-factor solution relating to styles of emotional experience (Lack of Attunement, Discordant, and Externalized), mechanisms controlling the experience and expression of emotions (Suppression, Dissociation, Avoidance, and Uncontrolled), and signs of inadequate processing (Intrusion). Internal reliability was moderate to high for six of eight factors. Preliminary findings suggested satisfactory convergent validity. Discussion: Overall, the psychometric properties of this scale appear promising. Work is in progress to refine the scale by incorporating additional items and by conducting further psychometric evaluations on new samples. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Baker, R., Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W. and Owens, M.

Journal: JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH

Volume: 62

Issue: 2

Pages: 167-178

ISSN: 0022-3999

DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.09.005

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Baker, R., Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W. and Owens, M.

Journal: Journal of psychosomatic research

Volume: 62

Issue: 2

Pages: 167-178

eISSN: 1879-1360

ISSN: 0022-3999

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to report on the development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an emotional processing scale, a 38-item self-report questionnaire designed to identify emotional processing styles and deficits. METHODS: An initial item pool derived from a conceptual model and clinical observations was piloted on clinical and community samples (n=150). The resulting 45-item scale was administered to patients with psychological problems, psychosomatic disorders, and physical disease, and to healthy individuals (n=460). Exploratory factor analysis was used to explore the underlying factor structure. RESULTS: Maximum likelihood factor analysis yielded an eight-factor solution relating to styles of emotional experience (Lack of Attunement, Discordant, and Externalized), mechanisms controlling the experience and expression of emotions (Suppression, Dissociation, Avoidance, and Uncontrolled), and signs of inadequate processing (Intrusion). Internal reliability was moderate to high for six of eight factors. Preliminary findings suggested satisfactory convergent validity. DISCUSSION: Overall, the psychometric properties of this scale appear promising. Work is in progress to refine the scale by incorporating additional items and by conducting further psychometric evaluations on new samples.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:52 on November 15, 2018.