Characteristics of single fallers and recurrent fallers among hospital in-patients

This source preferred by Stephen Allen

Authors: Vassallo, M., Sharma, J.C. and Allen, S.C.

http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?doi=10.1159/000052833

Journal: Gerontology

Volume: 48

Pages: 147-150

ISSN: 0304-324X

DOI: 10.1159/000052833

Background: Recurrent fallers constitute a minority of patients who fall but contribute considerably to the total number of falls recorded. Objective: To study the characteristics of recurrent fallers in a hospital setting. Methods: In a prospective observational study we investigated the characteristics of 1,025 patients admitted to a geriatric non-acute hospital. Patients were followed until discharge and were classified as non-fallers, single fallers or recurrent fallers. Results: We identified 824 non-fallers, 136 single fallers and 65 recurrent fallers contributing 175 falls. Compared to non-fallers, recurrent fallers were more likely to have pre-admission falls (p = 0.004), confusion (p < 0.0001), an unsafe gait (p = 0.0001) and be on tranquillisers (p = 0.018) and antidepressants (p = 0.006). They had longer stays in hospital (p < 0.0001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.0001). There was considerable overlap with risk factors for single fallers but compared to this group they were more likely to be confused (p = 0.027), and on antidepressant medication (p = 0.009). They also had a longer length of stay (p < 0.001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.03). Confusion (p = 0.0001), unsafe gait (p = 0.0006) and antidepressants (p = 0.018) were independently associated with recurrent falls. Conclusions: It is important to recognise the risk factors that prospectively identify a recurrent faller because of the significant contribution to total falls by a relatively small number of patients. This may be useful not only in trying to reduce total falls but also in trying to reduce injury.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Sharma, J.C. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: Gerontology

Volume: 48

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-150

ISSN: 0304-324X

DOI: 10.1159/000052833

BACKGROUND: Recurrent fallers constitute a minority of patients who fall but contribute considerably to the total number of falls recorded. OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of recurrent fallers in a hospital setting. METHODS: In a prospective observational study we investigated the characteristics of 1,025 patients admitted to a geriatric non-acute hospital. Patients were followed until discharge and were classified as non-fallers, single fallers or recurrent fallers. RESULTS: We identified 824 non-fallers, 136 single fallers and 65 recurrent fallers contributing 175 falls. Compared to non-fallers, recurrent fallers were more likely to have pre-admission falls (p = 0.004), confusion (p < 0.0001), an unsafe gait (p = 0.0001) and be on tranquillisers (p = 0.018) and antidepressants (p = 0.006). They had longer stays in hospital (p < 0.0001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.0001). There was considerable overlap with risk factors for single fallers but compared to this group they were more likely to be confused (p = 0.027), and on antidepressant medication (p = 0.009). They also had a longer length of stay (p < 0.001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.03). Confusion (p = 0.0001), unsafe gait (p = 0.0006) and antidepressants (p = 0.018) were independently associated with recurrent falls. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognise the risk factors that prospectively identify a recurrent faller because of the significant contribution to total falls by a relatively small number of patients. This may be useful not only in trying to reduce total falls but also in trying to reduce injury.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Sharma, J.C. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: Gerontology

Volume: 48

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-150

ISSN: 0304-324X

DOI: 10.1159/000052833

Background: Recurrent fallers constitute a minority of patients who fall but contribute considerably to the total number of falls recorded. Objective: To study the characteristics of recurrent fallers in a hospital setting. Methods: In a prospective observational study we investigated the characteristics of 1,025 patients admitted to a geriatric non-acute hospital. Patients were followed until discharge and were classified as non-fallers, single fallers or recurrent fallers. Results: We identified 824 non-fallers, 136 single fallers and 65 recurrent fallers contributing 175 falls. Compared to non-fallers, recurrent fallers were more likely to have pre-admission falls (p = 0.004), confusion (p < 0.0001), an unsafe gait (p = 0.0001) and be on tranquillisers (p = 0.018) and antidepressants (p = 0.006). They had longer stays in hospital (p < 0.0001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.0001). There was considerable overlap with risk factors for single fallers but compared to this group they were more likely to be confused (p = 0.027), and on antidepressant medication (p = 0.009). They also had a longer length of stay (p < 0.001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.03). Confusion (p = 0.0001), unsafe gait (p = 0.0006) and antidepressants (p = 0.018) were independently associated with recurrent falls. Conclusions: It is important to recognise the risk factors that prospectively identify a recurrent faller because of the significant contribution to total falls by a relatively small number of patients. This may be useful not only in trying to reduce total falls but also in trying to reduce injury. Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Vassallo, M., Sharma, J.C. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: GERONTOLOGY

Volume: 48

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-150

ISSN: 0304-324X

DOI: 10.1159/000052833

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Vassallo, M., Sharma, J.C. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: Gerontology

Volume: 48

Issue: 3

Pages: 147-150

eISSN: 1423-0003

ISSN: 0304-324X

BACKGROUND: Recurrent fallers constitute a minority of patients who fall but contribute considerably to the total number of falls recorded. OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of recurrent fallers in a hospital setting. METHODS: In a prospective observational study we investigated the characteristics of 1,025 patients admitted to a geriatric non-acute hospital. Patients were followed until discharge and were classified as non-fallers, single fallers or recurrent fallers. RESULTS: We identified 824 non-fallers, 136 single fallers and 65 recurrent fallers contributing 175 falls. Compared to non-fallers, recurrent fallers were more likely to have pre-admission falls (p = 0.004), confusion (p < 0.0001), an unsafe gait (p = 0.0001) and be on tranquillisers (p = 0.018) and antidepressants (p = 0.006). They had longer stays in hospital (p < 0.0001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.0001). There was considerable overlap with risk factors for single fallers but compared to this group they were more likely to be confused (p = 0.027), and on antidepressant medication (p = 0.009). They also had a longer length of stay (p < 0.001) and more nursing home discharges (p = 0.03). Confusion (p = 0.0001), unsafe gait (p = 0.0006) and antidepressants (p = 0.018) were independently associated with recurrent falls. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognise the risk factors that prospectively identify a recurrent faller because of the significant contribution to total falls by a relatively small number of patients. This may be useful not only in trying to reduce total falls but also in trying to reduce injury.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on April 21, 2019.