Sarcopenia

This source preferred by Stephen Allen

Authors: Allen, S.C. and Terry, C.E.

http://www.rila.co.uk/site/modules.php?name=Journals&file=journal2&func=showab&jid=005&aid=5200&iid=436

Journal: CME Geriatric Medicine

Volume: 9

Pages: 60-64

ISSN: 1475-1453

Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass with age. Older people make up an increasing proportion of populations worldwide and sarcopenia is an important clinical entity within this group, contributing to the high prevalence of disability. Its rising prevalence will consequently place increasing demands on the healthcare systems worldwide. Mechanisms underlying sarcopenia are multiple and include age-related loss and atrophy of muscle fibres, decline in mitochondrial function and deceased synthesis of muscle proteins. Exercise is an effective treatment for sarcopenia and should be encouraged throughout society in all age groups in order to reduce the impact of sarcopenia and help keep older people functioning to their full capacity.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Terry, C.E. and Allen, S.C.

Journal: CME Journal Geriatric Medicine

Volume: 9

Issue: 2

Pages: 60-64

ISSN: 1475-1453

Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass with age. Older people make up an increasing proportion of populations worldwide and sarcopenia is an important clinical entity within this group, contributing to the high prevalence of disability. Its rising prevalence will consequently place increasing demands on the healthcare systems worldwide. Mechanisms underlying sarcopenia are multiple and include age-related loss and atrophy of muscle fibres, decline in mitochondrial function and deceased synthesis of muscle proteins. Exercise is an effective treatment for sarcopenia and should be encouraged throughout society in all age groups in order to reduce the impact of sarcopenia and help keep older people functioning to their full capacity. © 2007 Rila Publications Ltd.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on June 16, 2019.