False start?: U.K. sprint coaches and Black/White stereotypes

This source preferred by Ian Jones

Authors: Turner, D. and Jones, I.

http://jbs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/2/155

Journal: Journal of Black Studies

Volume: 38

Pages: 155-176

ISSN: 0021-9347

DOI: 10.1177/0021934705285178

U.K. sprint coaches' employment of common racial stereotypes in explaining the success of Black and White sprinters was studied. It was hypothesized that Black success would be attributed to innate genetic factors, whereas White success would be attributed to socioeconomic advantages, intelligence, and hard work. Thirty-one sprint coaches participated in success attribution exercises. Quantitative results revealed that Black and White photograph conditions were generally scored similarly in relation to stereotypical factors. However, qualitative results indicated some stereotype replication and susceptibility to natural ability stereotypes due to an overemphasis on biological determinism, and modest recognition of less immediately apparent developmental factors. Although reassuring evidence was gained that U.K. sprint coaches do not widely employ stereotypes in attributing differently the success of Black and White athletes, there was sufficient evidence to necessitate continued vigilance. A theoretical model of stereotype influences in sprinting and recommendations for both coaching and coach education are presented.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Turner, D. and Jones, I.

Journal: Journal of Black Studies

Volume: 38

Issue: 2

Pages: 155-176

eISSN: 1552-4566

ISSN: 0021-9347

DOI: 10.1177/0021934705285178

U.K. sprint coaches' employment of common racial stereotypes in explaining the success of Black and White sprinters was studied. It was hypothesized that Black success would be attributed to innate genetic factors, whereas White success would be attributed to socioeconomic advantages, intelligence, and hard work. Thirty-one sprint coaches participated in success attribution exercises. Quantitative results revealed that Black and White photograph conditions were generally scored similarly in relation to stereotypical factors. However, qualitative results indicated some stereotype replication and susceptibility to natural ability stereotypes due to an overemphasis on biological determinism, and modest recognition of less immediately apparent developmental factors. Although reassuring evidence was gained that U.K. sprint coaches do not widely employ stereotypes in attributing differently the success of Black and White athletes, there was sufficient evidence to necessitate continued vigilance. A theoretical model of stereotype influences in sprinting and recommendations for both coaching and coach education are presented. © 2007 Sage Publications.

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