Human Dignity, Ethical Pluralism, and the Regulation of Modern Biotechnologies

This source preferred by Roger Brownsword

Authors: Brownsword, R.

Editors: Murphy, T.

Pages: 19-84

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199562572

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Brownsword, R.

ISBN: 9780199562572

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562572.003.0002

© The several contributors, 2009. All rights reserved. This chapter describes two human rights challenges generated by new technologies. The first is that the presence of three sometimes conflicting ethics (utilitarianism, dignitarianism, and human rights) makes it difficult for regulators to set agreed limits to the development and exploitation of modern biotechnology. It also means that there is no guarantee that human rights will emerge as the pre-eminent ethic. Second, because new technologies are regulatory tools, not just regulatory targets, advocates of human rights need to consider the limits that should be imposed on regulators who turn who modern technologies as regulatory tools. To fail to do this would be to risk the displacement of law by technology.

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