The right to truth, appropriate forum and the international criminal court

This source preferred by Melanie Klinkner

Authors: Klinkner, M.

Editors: Szablewska, N. and Bachmann, S.

Pages: 3-29

Publisher: Springer

The right to truth stems from the need of victims and relatives of the missing to know the fate of their loved ones, and has since been developed to apply to the perpetration of gross human rights violations more generally. Transitional justice mechanisms are seen as a key tool in realising this right. This chapter examines the origins and current scope of the right to truth before going on to explore the State obligations which arise pursuant to the right. It includes a consideration of the various domestic and international judicial mechanisms through which the right to truth might be implemented, examining the strengths and weaknesses of each forum. The chapter goes on to explore the extent to which the International Criminal Court, with its innovative, restorative and victim-oriented features, comprises a suitable forum for future realisation of the right to truth. The chapter concludes that the flexibility inherent in the Court’s Statute indicates that there is, albeit limited, scope to work towards the right’s implementation.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Klinkner, M. and Smith, E.

Pages: 3-29

ISBN: 9783319093895

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-09390-1_1

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. The right to truth stems from the need of victims and relatives of the missing to know the fate of their loved ones, and has since been developed to apply to the perpetration of gross human rights violations more generally. Transitional justice mechanisms are seen as a key tool in realising this right. This chapter examines the origins and current scope of the right to truth before going on to explore the State obligations which arise pursuant to the right. It includes a consideration of the various domestic and international judicial mechanisms through which the right to truth might be implemented, examining the strengths and weaknesses of each forum. The chapter goes on to explore the extent to which the International Criminal Court, with its innovative, restorative and victim–oriented features, comprises a suitable forum for future realisation of the right to truth. The chapter concludes that the flexibility inherent in the Court’s Statute indicates that there is, albeit limited, scope to work towards the right’s implementation.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.