Access schemes and packet scheduling techniques

Authors: Avgeropoulos, K., Chai, W.K., Giambene, G., Giannetti, S., Hongfei, D., Kueh, V.Y.H., Niebla, C.P., Pasqualetti, V., Sali, A. and Tsigkas, O.

Pages: 119-176

DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-53991-1_5

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Authors: Avgeropoulos, K., Chai, W.K., Giambene, G., Giannetti, S., Hongfei, D., Kueh, V.Y.H., Niebla, C.P., Pasqualetti, V., Sali, A. and Tsigkas, O.

Pages: 119-176

ISBN: 9780387368979

DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-53991-1_5

The dual objectives of achieving efficient satellite resource utilization and acceptable user QoS levels require a consistent, controllable and flexible Radio Resource Management (RRM) scheme. The interest is here in managing packet data traffic of multimedia nature in mobile satellite systems. Complexity is added by the presence of multimedia traffic classes with differentiated QoS requirements and for the dynamically-varying channel conditions with (possible) consequent adaptations at the physical layer. The MAC layer is the place in the protocol stack where RRM techniques operate. In fact, the achievable resource utilization efficiency and the resulting QoS are governed by MAC protocols that are used in the uplink case to manage the transmissions of dispersed terminals to an Earth station through the satellite and that are also employed in downlink to schedule the different transmissions from the Earth station to the terminals. Hence, the two essential components of the MAC layer are: access protocols and scheduling techniques. These are also the main targets of this Chapter. The studies carried out in this Chapter are related to Scenario 1 for what concerns S-UMTS (see Chapter 1, Section 1.4); however, the last part of this Chapter refers to a TDMA-like air interface. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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