Management style preference and its impact on employee job satisfaction in independent hotels: An exploratory study

Authors: Moital, M. and Bennett, R.

Editors: Rontos, K., Filipe, J. and Tsartas, P.

Publisher: Nova Science Publishers

ISBN: 978-1-63485-943-1

The paper explores hotel employee management style preferences and the extent to which these preferences have an impact on job satisfaction. The research takes an interpretative, inductive approach, using semi-structured interviews with eight front-of-house hotel employees in the UK. Preferences were found to be subjective to employees with participants not preferring one particular style but a mixture of traits. Preferences were shown to evolve over time, being influenced by factors including intrinsic (motivator) or extrinsic (hygiene) characteristics displayed by the manager as well as personal factors. Management style was shown to affect job satisfaction, but due to its subjectivity generalising the impact was particularly difficult, as was identifying/providing a ‘perfect’ Management Style. Recommendations include future research focusing on traits as opposed to styles and looking into the impact of job satisfaction and management style on job mobility, absenteeism and staff retention.

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Authors: Bennett, R. and Moital, M.

Pages: 303-319

ISBN: 9781634859202

© 2017 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. The paper explores hotel employee management style preferences and the extent to which these preferences have an impact on job satisfaction. The research takes an interpretative, inductive approach, using semi-structured interviews with eight front-ofhouse hotel employees in the UK. Preferences were found to be subjective to employees with participants not preferring one particular style but a mixture of traits. Preferences were shown to evolve over time, being influenced by factors including intrinsic (motivator) or extrinsic (hygiene) characteristics displayed by the manager as well as personal factors. Management style was shown to affect job satisfaction, but due to its subjectivity generalising the impact was particularly difficult, as was identifying/providing a ‘perfect’ Management Style. Recommendations include future research focusing on traits as opposed to styles and looking into the impact of job satisfaction and management style on job mobility, absenteeism and staff retention.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 17, 2020.