What formal models cannot show us: People issues during the prototyping process

This source preferred by Keith Phalp

Authors: Counsell, K., Phalp, K.T., Mendes, E. and Geddes, S.

Start date: 13 June 2005

Pages: 3-15

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 978-3540262008

This data was imported from DBLP:

Authors: Counsell, S., Phalp, K., Mendes, E. and Geddes, S.

Editors: Bomarius, F. and Komi-Sirviö, S.

https://doi.org/10.1007/b137178

Journal: PROFES

Volume: 3547

Pages: 3-15

Publisher: Springer

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Counsell, S., Phalp, K., Mendes, E. and Geddes, S.

Journal: Lecture Notes in Computer Science

Volume: 3547

Pages: 3-15

ISSN: 0302-9743

Modelling a process using techniques such as Role Activity Diagrams (RADs) [13] can illustrate a large amount of useful information about the process under study. What they cannot show as easily however, are the informal practices during that process. In this paper, we analyse the prototyping process as part of an IS development strategy across five companies. Interview text from project managers, prototypers and other development staff across the five companies was analysed. Interestingly, results point to several key recurring issues amongst staff. These include non-adherence to any prototyping guidelines or standards, sketchy change request procedures, concern over time and cost deadlines and the importance attached to developer experience during the overall process. The notion of prototyping as a simple and easily managed development strategy does not hold. Our analysis provides complementary qualitative data about the opinions of prototyping to inform business process reengineering of those formal RADs. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Counsell, S., Phalp, K., Mendes, E. and Geddes, S.

Journal: PRODUCT FOCUSED SOFTWARE PROCESS IMPROVEMENT, PROCEEDINGS

Volume: 3547

Pages: 3-15

ISSN: 0302-9743

The data on this page was last updated at 04:51 on December 12, 2018.