Benidorm and the ‘all you can eat’ buffet: Food, bodily functions and the carnivalesque

Authors: Kimber, S.

http://www.cmstudies.org/?page=upcoming_conference

Start date: 21 March 2012

This paper explores the relationship between horror film and food within contemporary horror cinema and transnational horror film cultures. Within the horror genre food, feeding and being fed have long been staple ingredients in terms of production, representation and identity (Newman 2011, Hantke 2009, Gelder 2000). For example, food and eating can be abject and even murderous. Narratives can be situated in locations linked to food preparation and consumption and set around meal times (Poultrygeist: Night of the Chicken Dead (2006). Monstrous characters may feed ravenously on human flesh including their own (In My Skin/Dans MA Peau (2002)). With respect to reception, circulation and marketing horror films have variously and at times simultaneously been considered junk food for the mind and a visual and aural feast. In terms of consumption horror films can be seen as pleasurable and anxiety inducing for being hard to stomach, with urban myths abound of audience members vomiting during and after screenings. For regulators, particularly in the UK, horror films featuring the killing and eating of live animals has led to censorship (Cannibal Holocaust 1980) and moral outrage (Old Boy/Oldeuboi (2003)). This paper seeks to offer a schema of the various and overlapping ways in which food has been employed and to what ends within horror films and horror film cultures. The paper will draw upon literature linked to food, film and popular culture (Zimmerman 2010, Parasecoli 2008, Bower 2004, Ferry 2003) and a range of contemporary horror films. Links will be made to the complex and ambiguous relationship between food and horror films drawing upon ideas such as; the abject, grotesque, affect, sensation, body, embodiment, transgression, ethics, power and identity.

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Authors: Pullen, C.

Pages: 44-64

ISBN: 9781137463234

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-46323-4

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bradley, P.

Pages: 9-26

ISBN: 9781137463234

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-46323-4

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bradley, P.

Journal: Food, Media and Contemporary Culture: The Edible Image

Pages: 1-274

ISBN: 9781137463234

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-46323-4

© Peri Bradley 2016. Food, Media and Contemporary Culture is designed to interrogate the cultural fascination with food as the focus of a growing number of visual texts that reveal the deep, psychological relationship that each of us has with rituals of preparing, presenting and consuming food and images of food.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bradley, P.

Journal: Food, Media and Contemporary Culture: The Edible Image

Pages: 1-5

ISBN: 9781137463234

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-46323-4

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Kimber, S.

Pages: 125-143

ISBN: 9781137463234

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-46323-4

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on December 15, 2018.