The application of psycholinguistic principles to website design

This source preferred by Jacqui Taylor

Authors: Terry, K. and Taylor, J.

Start date: 3 July 2003

Pages: 45-51

Publisher: Chapter of ACM SIGCHI New Zealand

Place of Publication: Palmerston North, N.Z.

ISBN: 9780473095536

Many businesses are looking to e-commerce as a way of maximising their turnover and creating new opportunities. The potential of applying psycholinguistic principles to improve the language used on websites has been overlooked. This study involved developing a website which drew on psycholinguistic principles, specifically transformational grammar and word frequency, and simulated a knowledge-based system by diagnosing users' needs. It was a between subjects design with 48 participants across four conditions. Results showed that moderate syntactic complexity significantly increases positive attitudes, F(1,48) = 6.216; p

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Authors: Terry, K. and Taylor, J.

Journal: Proceedings of CHINZ 2003: The 4th Annual Conference of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction New Zealand Chapter

Pages: 45-50

ISBN: 9780473095536

DOI: 10.1145/2331829.2331838

Many businesses are looking to e-commerce as a way of maximising their turnover and creating new opportunities. The potential of applying psycholinguistic principles to improve the language used on websites has been overlooked. This study involved developing a website which drew on psycholinguistic principles, specifically transformational grammar and word frequency, and simulated a knowledge-based system by diagnosing users' needs. It was a between subjects design with 48 participants across four conditions. Results showed that moderate syntactic complexity significantly increases positive attitudes, F(1,48) = 6.216; p<0.05. High word frequency resulted in significantly faster response times when using the website, F(1,48) = 13.938; p<0.01. More research is required to apply these and other psycholinguistic principles across a range of contexts. © 2003 ACM.

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