Eradication of the invasive Pseudorasbora parva results in increased growth and production of native fishes

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121388433/abstract

Journal: Ecology Of Freshwater Fish

Volume: 18

Pages: 8-14

ISSN: 0906-6691

DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0633.2008.00334.x

The topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, has been described as Europe's most invasive fish. To control their UK invasion, some lentic populations at risk of causing fluvial dispersal have been eradicated. The first of these operations was from a lake in north-west UK in March 2005 using rotenone application; prior to eradication, their mean density was estimated as 6.1 m−2 whereas since eradication, no P. parva have been recorded. Prior to rotenone application, the majority of native fishes were removed, held off-site and reintroduced following degradation of rotenone to safe levels. In the three growth seasons since their reintroduction and P. parva eradication, the abundance, somatic growth rate and production of roach Rutilus rutilus and common bream Abramis brama have increased significantly; production is now driven by a lower number of comparatively larger, faster growing individuals. These data suggest that the eradication of this P. parva population has been highly beneficial for the growth, recruitment and production of these native species.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

Journal: Ecology of Freshwater Fish

Volume: 18

Issue: 1

Pages: 8-14

eISSN: 1600-0633

ISSN: 0906-6691

DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0633.2008.00334.x

The topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, has been described as Europe's most invasive fish. To control their UK invasion, some lentic populations at risk of causing fluvial dispersal have been eradicated. The first of these operations was from a lake in north-west UK in March 2005 using rotenone application; prior to eradication, their mean density was estimated as 6.1 m-2 whereas since eradication, no P. parva have been recorded. Prior to rotenone application, the majority of native fishes were removed, held off-site and reintroduced following degradation of rotenone to safe levels. In the three growth seasons since their reintroduction and P. parva eradication, the abundance, somatic growth rate and production of roach Rutilus rutilus and common bream Abramis brama have increased significantly; production is now driven by a lower number of comparatively larger, faster growing individuals. These data suggest that the eradication of this P. parva population has been highly beneficial for the growth, recruitment and production of these native species. © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

Journal: ECOLOGY OF FRESHWATER FISH

Volume: 18

Issue: 1

Pages: 8-14

ISSN: 0906-6691

DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0633.2008.00334.x

The data on this page was last updated at 04:52 on April 23, 2019.