AIDS orphans, parents and children in documentary: Disclosure, performance and sacrifice

This source preferred by Christopher Pullen

Authors: Pullen, C.

http://mcs.sagepub.com/cgi/pdf_extract/30/5/663

Journal: Media, Culture and Society

Volume: 30

Pages: 663-676

ISSN: 0163-4437

DOI: 10.1177/0163443708094014

This essay discusses the emergence of the AIDS orphan as a central performative social figure in contemporary documentary.Just as charities involved in famine rescue often employ shocking images of starving children with emaciated bodies and decaying social lives, the image of the AIDS orphan can also become a commodity, and at the same time a point of conscience. This isolated and frail new documentary voice possesses an intimacy and an inherent emotional value which whilst it is powerful and useful, at the same time remains ethically questionable.

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Authors: Pullen, C.

Journal: Media, Culture and Society

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 663-676

eISSN: 1460-3675

ISSN: 0163-4437

DOI: 10.1177/0163443708094014

This article discusses the representation of AIDS within documentary film, specifically examining Third World identities in Inigo Gilmore's Nkosi's Story (BBC, 2001, UK), Brian Wood's Dying for Drugs and Orphans of Nkandla (True Vision Productions, 2003'4, UK) and Xolizwa Sithole's Shouting Silent (Renee Rosen and Xolizwa Sithole, 2002, South Africa). A central focus is an examination of the parent'child relationship, and how children may be used as commodities of identity. Here the idea of performance is foregrounded, contextualizing its discursive use within documentary. © 2008 SAGE Publications.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pullen, C.

Journal: MEDIA CULTURE & SOCIETY

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 663-+

ISSN: 0163-4437

DOI: 10.1177/0163443708094014

The data on this page was last updated at 05:30 on January 21, 2021.