Mice, scats and burials: Unusual concentrations of microfauna found in human burials at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük, Central Anatolia

This source preferred by Emma Jenkins

Authors: Jenkins, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20813/

Journal: Journal of Social Archaeology

Volume: 12

Issue: 3

Pages: 380-403

Publisher: Sage

ISSN: 1469-6053

DOI: 10.1177/1469605312455765

Three human burials were found at Çatalhöyük that contained large microfaunal assemblages. Taphonomic analysis demonstrated that many of these elements had passed through the digestive tract of a small carnivore, indicating that the microfauna entered the burials in carnivore scats rather than as carcasses. One of the burials in particular (F. 513) contained an enormous quantity of microfauna which was concentrated over the torso of the body. It is concluded that the scats were deliberately placed in the burials by the human inhabitants of the site as part of ritualistic practice. Furthermore, it is suggested that small carnivores were encouraged to enter Çatalhöyük in order to control house mice, and other small mammal, numbers.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Jenkins, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20813/

Journal: Journal of Social Archaeology

Volume: 12

Issue: 3

Pages: 380-403

eISSN: 1741-2951

ISSN: 1469-6053

DOI: 10.1177/1469605312455765

Three human burials were found at Çatalhöyük that contained large microfaunal assemblages. Taphonomic analysis demonstrated that many of these elements had passed through the digestive tract of a small carnivore, indicating that the microfauna entered the burials in carnivore scats rather than as carcasses. One of the burials in particular (F. 513) contained an enormous quantity of microfauna which was concentrated over the torso of the body. It is concluded that the scats were deliberately placed in the burials by the human inhabitants of the site as part of ritualistic practice. Furthermore, it is suggested that small carnivores were encouraged to enter Çatalhöyük in order to control house mice, and other small mammal, numbers. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Jenkins, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/20813/

Journal: JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Volume: 12

Issue: 3

Pages: 380-403

eISSN: 1741-2951

ISSN: 1469-6053

DOI: 10.1177/1469605312455765

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on February 19, 2020.