The effects of common peroneal stimulation on the effort and speed of walking: A randomized controlled trial with chronic hemiplegic patients

This source preferred by Ian Swain

Authors: Burridge, J.H., Taylor, P.N., Hagan, S.A., Wood, D.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Clinical Rehabilitation

Volume: 11

Pages: 201-210

ISSN: 0269-2155

DOI: 10.1177/026921559701100303

Objective: To measure the effect of the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator (ODFS), a common peroneal stimulator, on the effort and speed of walking. Design: A randomized controlled trial.

Subjects: Hemiplegic patients who had suffered a single stroke at least six months prior to the start of the trial whose walking was impaired by a drop-foot.

Interventions: The treatment, functional electrical stimulation (FES) group, used the stimulator and received a course of physiotherapy; the control group received physiotherapy alone.

Main outcome measures: Changes in walking speed measured over 10 m and the effort of walking measured by physiological cost index (PCI).

Results: Thirty-two subjects completed the trial, 16 in the FES group and 16 in the control group. Mean increase in walking speed between the beginning and end of the trial was 20.5% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used), and 5.2% in the control group. Improvement was also measured in PCI with a reduction of 24.9% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used) and 1 % in the control group. No improvement in these parameters was measured in the FES group when the stimulator was not used.

Conclusion: Walking was statistically significantly improved when the ODFS was worn but no 'carry-over' was measured. Physiotherapy alone, in this group of subjects with established stroke, did not improve walking.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Burridge, J.H., Taylor, P.N., Hagan, S.A., Wood, D.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Clin Rehabil

Volume: 11

Issue: 3

Pages: 201-210

ISSN: 0269-2155

DOI: 10.1177/026921559701100303

OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator (ODFS), a common peroneal stimulator, on the effort and speed of walking. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Hemiplegic patients who had suffered a single stroke at least six months prior to the start of the trial whose walking was impaired by a drop-foot. INTERVENTIONS: The treatment, functional electrical stimulation (FES) group, used the stimulator and received a course of physiotherapy; the control group received physiotherapy alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in walking speed measured over 10 m and the effort of walking measured by physiological cost index (PCI). RESULTS: Thirty-two subjects completed the trial, 16 in the FES group and 16 in the control group. Mean increase in walking speed between the beginning and end of the trial was 20.5% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used), and 5.2% in the control group. Improvement was also measured in PCI with a reduction of 24.9% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used) and 1% in the control group. No improvement in these parameters was measured in the FES group when the stimulator was not used. CONCLUSION: Walking was statistically significantly improved when the ODFS was worn but no 'carry-over' was measured. Physiotherapy alone, in this group of subjects with established stroke, did not improve walking.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Burridge, J.H., Taylor, P.N., Hagan, S.A., Wood, D.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Clinical Rehabilitation

Volume: 11

Issue: 3

Pages: 201-210

ISSN: 0269-2155

DOI: 10.1177/026921559701100303

Objective: To measure the effect of the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator (ODFS), a common peroneal stimulator, on the effort and speed of walking. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Subjects: Hemiplegic patients who had suffered a single stroke at least six months prior to the start of the trial whose walking was impaired by a drop-foot. Interventions: The treatment, functional electrical stimulation (FES) group, used the stimulator and received a course of physiotherapy; the control group received physiotherapy alone. Main outcome measures: Changes in walking speed measured over 10 m and the effort of walking measured by physiological cost index (PCI). Results: Thirty-two subjects completed the trial, 16 in the FES group and 16 in the control group. Mean increase in walking speed between the beginning and end of the trial was 20.5% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used), and 5.2% in the control group. Improvement was also measured in PCI with a reduction of 24.9% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used) and 1% in the control group. No improvement in these parameters was measured in the FES group when the stimulator was not used. Conclusion: Walking was statistically significantly improved when the ODFS was worn but no 'carry-over' was measured. Physiotherapy alone, in this group of subjects with established stroke, did not improve walking.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Burridge, J.H., Taylor, P.N., Hagan, S.A., Wood, D.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Clinical rehabilitation

Volume: 11

Issue: 3

Pages: 201-210

eISSN: 1477-0873

ISSN: 0269-2155

OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator (ODFS), a common peroneal stimulator, on the effort and speed of walking. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Hemiplegic patients who had suffered a single stroke at least six months prior to the start of the trial whose walking was impaired by a drop-foot. INTERVENTIONS: The treatment, functional electrical stimulation (FES) group, used the stimulator and received a course of physiotherapy; the control group received physiotherapy alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in walking speed measured over 10 m and the effort of walking measured by physiological cost index (PCI). RESULTS: Thirty-two subjects completed the trial, 16 in the FES group and 16 in the control group. Mean increase in walking speed between the beginning and end of the trial was 20.5% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used), and 5.2% in the control group. Improvement was also measured in PCI with a reduction of 24.9% in the FES group (when the stimulator was used) and 1% in the control group. No improvement in these parameters was measured in the FES group when the stimulator was not used. CONCLUSION: Walking was statistically significantly improved when the ODFS was worn but no 'carry-over' was measured. Physiotherapy alone, in this group of subjects with established stroke, did not improve walking.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 19, 2019.