Clinical use of the odstock dropped foot stimulator: Its effect on the speed and effort of walking

This source preferred by Ian Swain

Authors: Taylor, P.N., Burridge, J.H., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D.E., Norton, J.A., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.D.

http://www.archives-pmr.org/article/S0003-9993%2899%2990333-7/abstract

Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Volume: 80

Pages: 1577-1583

ISSN: 0003-9993

Objective: To assess the clinical effectiveness of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator by analysis of its effect on physiological cost index (PCI) and speed of walking. This functional electrical stimulation (FES) device stimulates the common peroneal nerve during the swing phase of gait.

Design: A retrospective study of patients who had used the device for months.

Subjects: One hundred fifty-one patients with a dropped foot resulting from an upper motor neuron lesion.

Setting: A medical physics and biomedical engineering department of a district general hospital specializing in the clinical application of FES and a neurophysiotherapy department at a separate hospital.

Main Outcome Measures: Changes in walking speed and effort of walking, as measured by PCI over a 10-meter course.

Results: There was a 92.7% compliance with treatment. Stroke patients showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% (p < .01) and reduction in PCI of 31% (p < .01) with stimulation, and changes of 14% (p < .01) and 19% (p < .01), respectively, while, not using the stimulator. Multiple sclerosis patients gained similar orthotic benefit but no “carry-over.”

Conclusions: The measured differences in walking with and without stimulation were statistically significant in the stroke and multiple sclerosis groups. In this study use of the stimulator improved walking. Those with stroke demonstrated a shortterm “carry-over” effect.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Taylor, P.N., Burridge, J.H., Dunkerley, A.L., Wood, D.E., Norton, J.A., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Arch Phys Med Rehabil

Volume: 80

Issue: 12

Pages: 1577-1583

ISSN: 0003-9993

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical effectiveness of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator by analysis of its effect on physiological cost index (PCI) and speed of walking. This functional electrical stimulation (FES) device stimulates the common peroneal nerve during the swing phase of gait. DESIGN: A retrospective study of patients who had used the device for 4 1/2 months. SUBJECTS: One hundred fifty-one patients with a dropped foot resulting from an upper motor neuron lesion. SETTING: A medical physics and biomedical engineering department of a district general hospital specializing in the clinical application of FES and a neurophysiotherapy department at a separate hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in walking speed and effort of walking, as measured by PCI over a 10-meter course. RESULTS: There was a 92.7% compliance with treatment. Stroke patients showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% (p<.01) and reduction in PCI of 31% (p<.01) with stimulation, and changes of 14% (p<.01) and 19% (p<.01), respectively, while not using the stimulator. Multiple sclerosis patients gained similar orthotic benefit but no "carry-over." CONCLUSIONS: The measured differences in walking with and without stimulation were statistically significant in the stroke and multiple sclerosis groups. In this study use of the stimulator improved walking. Those with stroke demonstrated a short-term "carry-over" effect.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Taylor, P.N., Burridge, J.H., Dunkerley, A.L., Wood, D.E., Norton, J.A., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Volume: 80

Issue: 12

Pages: 1577-1583

ISSN: 0003-9993

DOI: 10.1016/S0003-9993(99)90333-7

Objective: To assess the clinical effectiveness of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator by analysis of its effect on physiological cost index (PCI) and speed of walking. This functional electrical stimulation (FES) device stimulates the common peroneal nerve during the swing phase of gait. Design: A retrospective study of patients who had used the device for 4 1/2 months. Subjects: One hundred fifty-one patients with a dropped foot resulting from an upper motor neuron lesion. Setting: A medical physics and biomedical engineering department of a district general hospital specializing in the clinical application of FES and a neurophysiotherapy department at a separate hospital. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in walking speed and effort of walking, as measured by PCI over a 10-meter course. Results: There was a 92.7% compliance with treatment. Stroke patients showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% (p < .01) and reduction in PCI of 31% (p < .01) with stimulation, and changes of 14% (p < .01) and 19% (p < .01), respectively, while not using the stimulator. Multiple sclerosis patients gained similar orthotic benefit but no 'carry-over'. Conclusions: The measured differences in walking with and without stimulation were statistically significant in the stroke and multiple sclerosis groups. In this study use of the stimulator improved walking. Those with stroke demonstrated a short-term 'carry-over' effect.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Taylor, P.N., Burridge, J.H., Dunkerley, A.L., Wood, D.E., Norton, J.A., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation

Volume: 80

Issue: 12

Pages: 1577-1583

eISSN: 1532-821X

ISSN: 0003-9993

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical effectiveness of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator by analysis of its effect on physiological cost index (PCI) and speed of walking. This functional electrical stimulation (FES) device stimulates the common peroneal nerve during the swing phase of gait. DESIGN: A retrospective study of patients who had used the device for 4 1/2 months. SUBJECTS: One hundred fifty-one patients with a dropped foot resulting from an upper motor neuron lesion. SETTING: A medical physics and biomedical engineering department of a district general hospital specializing in the clinical application of FES and a neurophysiotherapy department at a separate hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in walking speed and effort of walking, as measured by PCI over a 10-meter course. RESULTS: There was a 92.7% compliance with treatment. Stroke patients showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% (p<.01) and reduction in PCI of 31% (p<.01) with stimulation, and changes of 14% (p<.01) and 19% (p<.01), respectively, while not using the stimulator. Multiple sclerosis patients gained similar orthotic benefit but no "carry-over." CONCLUSIONS: The measured differences in walking with and without stimulation were statistically significant in the stroke and multiple sclerosis groups. In this study use of the stimulator improved walking. Those with stroke demonstrated a short-term "carry-over" effect.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 20, 2019.