Clinical audit of 5 years provision of the Odstock dropped foot stimulator

This source preferred by Ian Swain

Authors: Taylor, P., Burridge, J., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D.E., Norton, J.A., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Artificial Organs

Volume: 23

Pages: 440-442

ISSN: 0160-564X

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1594.1999.06374.x

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a foot switch controlled single channel neuromuscular stimulator for correction of dropped foot. Following a randomized controlled trial, the ODFS was recommended for use in the United Kingdom's National Health Service and a clinical service established. The patient performance was assessed by measurement of walking speed over 10 m, physiological cost index (PCI), and by questionnaire. After 4.5 months stroke patients (n = 111) showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% and reduction in PCI of 31% with stimulation and changes of 14% and 19%, respectively, unassisted. Multiple sclerosis patients (n = 21) gained similar orthotic benefit but no carry over. The principal reason cited for using the equipment was that it reduced the effort of walking. The principal reasons identified for discontinuing were an improvement in mobility, electrode positioning difficulties, and deteriorating mobility. A comprehensive clinical follow-up service is essential to achieve the maximum continuing benefit from FES based orthosis.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Taylor, P., Burridge, J., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D., Norton, J., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artif Organs

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 440-442

ISSN: 0160-564X

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a foot switch controlled single channel neuromuscular stimulator for correction of dropped foot. Following a randomized controlled trial, the ODFS was recommended for use in the United Kingdom's National Health Service and a clinical service established. The patient performance was assessed by measurement of walking speed over 10 m, physiological cost index (PCI), and by questionnaire. After 4.5 months stroke patients (n = 111) showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% and reduction in PCI of 31% with stimulation and changes of 14% and 19%, respectively, unassisted. Multiple sclerosis patients (n = 21) gained similar orthotic benefit but no carry over. The principal reason cited for using the equipment was that it reduced the effort of walking. The principal reasons identified for discontinuing were an improvement in mobility, electrode positioning difficulties, and deteriorating mobility. A comprehensive clinical follow-up service is essential to achieve the maximum continuing benefit from FES based orthosis.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Taylor, P., Burridge, J., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D., Norton, J., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artificial Organs

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 440-442

ISSN: 0160-564X

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1594.1999.06374.x

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a foot switch controlled single channel neuromuscular stimulator for correction of dropped foot. Following a randomized controlled trial, the ODFS was recommended for use in the United Kingdom's National Health Service and a clinical service established. The patient performance was assessed by measurement of walking speed over 10 m, physiological cost index (PCI), and by questionnaire. After 4.5 months stroke patients (n = 111) showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% and reduction in PCI of 31% with stimulation and changes of 14% and 19%, respectively, unassisted. Multiple sclerosis patients (n = 21) gained similar orthotic benefit but no carry over. The principal reason cited for using the equipment was that it reduced the effort of walking. The principal reasons identified for discontinuing were an improvement in mobility, electrode positioning difficulties, and deteriorating mobility. A comprehensive clinical follow-up service is essential to achieve the maximum continuing benefit from FES based orthosis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Taylor, P., Burridge, J., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D., Norton, J., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.

Journal: ARTIFICIAL ORGANS

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 440-442

ISSN: 0160-564X

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1594.1999.06374.x

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Taylor, P., Burridge, J., Dunkerley, A., Wood, D., Norton, J., Singleton, C. and Swain, I.

Journal: Artificial organs

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 440-442

eISSN: 1525-1594

ISSN: 0160-564X

The Odstock dropped foot stimulator (ODFS) is a foot switch controlled single channel neuromuscular stimulator for correction of dropped foot. Following a randomized controlled trial, the ODFS was recommended for use in the United Kingdom's National Health Service and a clinical service established. The patient performance was assessed by measurement of walking speed over 10 m, physiological cost index (PCI), and by questionnaire. After 4.5 months stroke patients (n = 111) showed a mean increase in walking speed of 27% and reduction in PCI of 31% with stimulation and changes of 14% and 19%, respectively, unassisted. Multiple sclerosis patients (n = 21) gained similar orthotic benefit but no carry over. The principal reason cited for using the equipment was that it reduced the effort of walking. The principal reasons identified for discontinuing were an improvement in mobility, electrode positioning difficulties, and deteriorating mobility. A comprehensive clinical follow-up service is essential to achieve the maximum continuing benefit from FES based orthosis.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on July 15, 2019.