The involuntary capture of attention by novel feature pairings: A study of voice-location integration in auditory sensory memory

This source preferred by Jane Elsley

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Maybery, M.T. and Elsley, J.V.

Journal: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics

Volume: 72

Issue: 2

Pages: 279-284

ISSN: 1943-3921

DOI: 10.3758/APP.72.2.279

Past researchers of the integration of information in memory have typically required participants to attend to and/or commit to memory the stimuli conveying distinct features, rendering difficult the examination of whether the maintenance of the feature pairings can occur involuntarily. To address this issue, the integration of voice and location information in auditory sensory memory was measured using a cross-modal oddball task, in which task-irrelevant auditory deviants are known to capture attention in an involuntary fashion. Participants categorized visual digits presented shortly after to-be-ignored sounds. These sounds consisted in the same phoneme played simultaneously in both ears but in different voices (female in one ear, male in the other). On most trials, the pairing of voice to location was constant (standard sound). On rare and unpredictable trials, the voices swapped locations (deviant sound). In line with past work on attention capture by auditory novelty, the participants were significantly slower to judge the visual digits following the deviant sound, indicating the involuntary encoding of the links between voice and location in auditory memory. These results suggest that voices and locations are integrated in memory and that this binding occurs in conditions in which participants do not intend to commit any information to memory.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Maybery, M.T. and Elsley, J.

Journal: Atten Percept Psychophys

Volume: 72

Issue: 2

Pages: 279-284

eISSN: 1943-393X

DOI: 10.3758/APP.72.2.279

Past researchers of the integration of information in memory have typically required participants to attend to and/or commit to memory the stimuli conveying distinct features, rendering difficult the examination of whether the maintenance of the feature pairings can occur involuntarily. To address this issue, the integration of voice and location information in auditory sensory memory was measured using a cross-modal oddball task, in which task-irrelevant auditory deviants are known to capture attention in an involuntary fashion. Participants categorized visual digits presented shortly after to-be-ignored sounds. These sounds consisted in the same phoneme played simultaneously in both ears but in different voices (female in one ear, male in the other). On most trials, the pairing of voice to location was constant (standard sound). On rare and unpredictable trials, the voices swapped locations (deviant sound). In line with past work on attention capture by auditory novelty, the participants were significantly slower to judge the visual digits following the deviant sound, indicating the involuntary encoding of the links between voice and location in auditory memory. These results suggest that voices and locations are integrated in memory and that this binding occurs in conditions in which participants do not intend to commit any information to memory.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Maybery, M.T. and Elsley, J.

Journal: Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics

Volume: 72

Issue: 2

Pages: 279-284

ISSN: 1943-3921

DOI: 10.3758/APP.72.2.279

Past researchers of the integration of information in memory have typically required participants to attend to and/or commit to memory the stimuli conveying distinct features, rendering difficult the examination of whether the maintenance of the feature pairings can occur involuntarily. To address this issue, the integration of voice and location information in auditory sensory memory was measured using a cross-modal oddball task, in which taskirrelevant auditory deviants are known to capture attention in an involuntary fashion. Participants categorized visual digits presented shortly after to-be-ignored sounds. These sounds consisted in the same phoneme played simultaneously in both ears but in different voices (female in one ear, male in the other). On most trials, the pairing of voice to location was constant (standard sound). On rare and unpredictable trials, the voices swapped locations (deviant sound). In line with past work on attention capture by auditory novelty, the participants were significantly slower to judge the visual digits following the deviant sound, indicating the involuntary encoding of the links between voice and location in auditory memory. These results suggest that voices and locations are integrated in memory and that this binding occurs in conditions in which participants do not intend to commit any information to memory. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Parmentier, F.B.R., Maybery, M.T. and Elsley, J.

Journal: ATTENTION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS

Volume: 72

Issue: 2

Pages: 279-284

eISSN: 1943-393X

ISSN: 1943-3921

DOI: 10.3758/APP.72.2.279

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Parmentier, F.B., Maybery, M.T. and Elsley, J.

Journal: Attention, perception & psychophysics

Volume: 72

Issue: 2

Pages: 279-284

eISSN: 1943-393X

ISSN: 1943-3921

Past researchers of the integration of information in memory have typically required participants to attend to and/or commit to memory the stimuli conveying distinct features, rendering difficult the examination of whether the maintenance of the feature pairings can occur involuntarily. To address this issue, the integration of voice and location information in auditory sensory memory was measured using a cross-modal oddball task, in which task-irrelevant auditory deviants are known to capture attention in an involuntary fashion. Participants categorized visual digits presented shortly after to-be-ignored sounds. These sounds consisted in the same phoneme played simultaneously in both ears but in different voices (female in one ear, male in the other). On most trials, the pairing of voice to location was constant (standard sound). On rare and unpredictable trials, the voices swapped locations (deviant sound). In line with past work on attention capture by auditory novelty, the participants were significantly slower to judge the visual digits following the deviant sound, indicating the involuntary encoding of the links between voice and location in auditory memory. These results suggest that voices and locations are integrated in memory and that this binding occurs in conditions in which participants do not intend to commit any information to memory.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.