Consideration of future consequences scale: Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Authors: Hevey, D., Pertl, M., Thomas, K., Maher, L., Craig, A. and Ni Chuinneagain, S.

Journal: Personality and Individual Differences

Volume: 48

Issue: 5

Pages: 654-657

ISSN: 0191-8869

DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.006

Abstract:

Individual differences in the Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) are typically assessed using the 12-item scale developed by Strathman, Gleicher, Boninger, and Edwards (1994). However, in contrast to the unidimensional model proposed by the scale developers, recent factor analyses have produced two-dimensional models of the scale. Confirmatory factor analyses were used in this study to evaluate different 1- and 2-factor models based on data provided by 590 (236 males, 354 females) young adult members of the general public. Although some alternative models showed promise, the 12-item single factor model with method effects associated with positively and negatively worded items provided best fit. Implications for the assessment of CFC are considered. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Source: Scopus

Consideration of future consequences scale: Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Authors: Hevey, D., Pertl, M., Thomas, K., Maher, L., Craig, A. and Chuinneagain, S.N.

Journal: PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES

Volume: 48

Issue: 5

Pages: 654-657

ISSN: 0191-8869

DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.006

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Consideration of future consequences scale: Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Authors: Hevey, D., Pertl, M., Thomas, K., Maher, L., Craig, A. and Ni Chuinneagain, S.

Journal: Personality and Individual Differences

Volume: 48

Pages: 654-657

ISSN: 0191-8869

DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.006

Abstract:

Individual differences in the Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) are typically assessed using the 12-item scale developed by Strathman, Gleicher, Boninger, and Edwards (1994). However, in contrast to the unidimensional model proposed by the scale developers, recent factor analyses have produced two dimensional models of the scale. Confirmatory factor analyses were used in this study to evaluate different 1- and 2-factor models based on data provided by 590 (236 males, 354 females) young adult members of the general public. Although some alternative models showed promise, the 12-item single factor model with method effects associated with positively and negatively worded items provided best fit. Implications for the assessment of CFC are considered.

http://www.elsevier.com/locate/paid

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Kevin Thomas