Reconstructing the origin and elaboration of insect-trapping inflorescences in the araceae

Authors: Bröderbauer, D., Diaz, A. and Weber, A.

Journal: American Journal of Botany

Volume: 99

Issue: 10

Pages: 1666-1679

ISSN: 0002-9122

DOI: 10.3732/ajb.1200274

Abstract:
  • Premise of the study: Floral traps are among the most sophisticated devices that have evolved in angiosperms in the context of pollination, but the evolution of trap pollination has not yet been studied in a phylogenetic context. We aim to determine the evolutionary history of morphological traits that facilitate trap pollination and to elucidate the impact of pollinators on the evolution of inflorescence traps in the family Araceae. • Methods: Inflorescence morphology was investigated to determine the presence of trapping devices and to classify functional types of traps. We inferred phylogenetic relationships in the family using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Character evolution of trapping devices, trap types, and pollinator types was then assessed with maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. We also tested for an association of trap pollination with specific pollinator types. • Key results: Inflorescence traps have evolved independently at least 10 times within the Araceae. Trapping devices were found in 27 genera. On the basis of different combinations of trapping devices, six functional types of traps were identified. Trap pollination in Araceae is correlated with pollination by flies. • Conclusions: Trap pollination in the Araceae is more common than was previously thought. Preadaptations such as papillate cells or elongated sterile flowers facilitated the evolution of inflorescence traps. In some clades, imperfect traps served as a precursor for the evolution of more elaborate traps. Traps that evolved in association with fly pollination were most probably derived from mutualistic ancestors, offering a brood-site to their pollinators. © 2012 Botanical Society of America.

Source: Scopus

Preferred by: Anita Diaz Isla

Reconstructing the origin and elaboration of insect-trapping inflorescences in the Araceae.

Authors: Bröderbauer, D., Diaz, A. and Weber, A.

Journal: Am J Bot

Volume: 99

Issue: 10

Pages: 1666-1679

eISSN: 1537-2197

DOI: 10.3732/ajb.1200274

Abstract:

UNLABELLED: PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Floral traps are among the most sophisticated devices that have evolved in angiosperms in the context of pollination, but the evolution of trap pollination has not yet been studied in a phylogenetic context. We aim to determine the evolutionary history of morphological traits that facilitate trap pollination and to elucidate the impact of pollinators on the evolution of inflorescence traps in the family Araceae. • METHODS: Inflorescence morphology was investigated to determine the presence of trapping devices and to classify functional types of traps. We inferred phylogenetic relationships in the family using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Character evolution of trapping devices, trap types, and pollinator types was then assessed with maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. We also tested for an association of trap pollination with specific pollinator types. • KEY RESULTS: Inflorescence traps have evolved independently at least 10 times within the Araceae. Trapping devices were found in 27 genera. On the basis of different combinations of trapping devices, six functional types of traps were identified. Trap pollination in Araceae is correlated with pollination by flies. • CONCLUSIONS: Trap pollination in the Araceae is more common than was previously thought. Preadaptations such as papillate cells or elongated sterile flowers facilitated the evolution of inflorescence traps. In some clades, imperfect traps served as a precursor for the evolution of more elaborate traps. Traps that evolved in association with fly pollination were most probably derived from mutualistic ancestors, offering a brood-site to their pollinators.

Source: PubMed

RECONSTRUCTING THE ORIGIN AND ELABORATION OF INSECT-TRAPPING INFLORESCENCES IN THE ARACEAE

Authors: Broederbauer, D., Diaz, A. and Weber, A.

Journal: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY

Volume: 99

Issue: 10

Pages: 1666-1679

eISSN: 1537-2197

ISSN: 0002-9122

DOI: 10.3732/ajb.1200274

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Reconstructing the origin and elaboration of insect-trapping inflorescences in the Araceae.

Authors: Bröderbauer, D., Diaz, A. and Weber, A.

Journal: American journal of botany

Volume: 99

Issue: 10

Pages: 1666-1679

eISSN: 1537-2197

ISSN: 0002-9122

DOI: 10.3732/ajb.1200274

Abstract:

Unlabelled

Premise of the study

Floral traps are among the most sophisticated devices that have evolved in angiosperms in the context of pollination, but the evolution of trap pollination has not yet been studied in a phylogenetic context. We aim to determine the evolutionary history of morphological traits that facilitate trap pollination and to elucidate the impact of pollinators on the evolution of inflorescence traps in the family Araceae. •

Methods

Inflorescence morphology was investigated to determine the presence of trapping devices and to classify functional types of traps. We inferred phylogenetic relationships in the family using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Character evolution of trapping devices, trap types, and pollinator types was then assessed with maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. We also tested for an association of trap pollination with specific pollinator types. •

Key results

Inflorescence traps have evolved independently at least 10 times within the Araceae. Trapping devices were found in 27 genera. On the basis of different combinations of trapping devices, six functional types of traps were identified. Trap pollination in Araceae is correlated with pollination by flies. •

Conclusions

Trap pollination in the Araceae is more common than was previously thought. Preadaptations such as papillate cells or elongated sterile flowers facilitated the evolution of inflorescence traps. In some clades, imperfect traps served as a precursor for the evolution of more elaborate traps. Traps that evolved in association with fly pollination were most probably derived from mutualistic ancestors, offering a brood-site to their pollinators.

Source: Europe PubMed Central