Reflecting on nurses' views on using research in practice

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Heaslip, V., Hewitt-Taylor, J. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: Br J Nurs

Volume: 21

Issue: 22

Pages: 1341-1346

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2012.21.22.1341

This paper follows a previous paper (Hewitt-Taylor et al, 2012) in which the authors summarised their reflections on the literature relating to the application of research in practice. This paper builds on these reflections and reports on the findings from one aspect of a study that explored nurses' views on using research in practice. Quantitative methods of data collection and analysis were used and data were gathered using questionnaires. The findings suggest that nurses generally value research, but this does not necessarily mean that they base individual decisions on particular research findings, or that research is considered the most important form of evidence in direct practice. In addition, the resources that enable nurses to find, appraise and make decisions about using research, are not always readily available in practice settings. From this part of the study, it can be concluded that for research utilisation to increase, time, resources, role models and environments that support this ethos are needed, and that an emphasis on research should not eclipse other key forms of nursing knowledge such as patient views and experiences, and professional expertise in the promotion of evidence-based practice.

This source preferred by Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor and Vanessa Heaslip

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Heaslip, V., Hewitt-Taylor, J. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 22

Pages: 1341-1346

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2012.21.22.1341

This paper follows a previous paper (Hewitt-Taylor et al, 2012) in which the authors summarised their reflections on the literature relating to the application of research in practice. This paper builds on these reflections and reports on the findings from one aspect of a study that explored nurses' views on using research in practice. Quantitative methods of data collection and analysis were used and data were gathered using questionnaires. The findings suggest that nurses generally value research, but this does not necessarily mean that they base individual decisions on particular research findings, or that research is considered the most important form of evidence in direct practice. In addition, the resources that enable nurses to find, appraise and make decisions about using research, are not always readily available in practice settings. From this part of the study, it can be concluded that for research utilisation to increase, time, resources, role models and environments that support this ethos are needed, and that an emphasis on research should not eclipse other key forms of nursing knowledge such as patient views and experiences, and professional expertise in the promotion of evidence-based practice.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Heaslip, V., Hewitt-Taylor, J. and Rowe, N.E.

Journal: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Volume: 21

Issue: 22

Pages: 1341-1346

ISSN: 0966-0461

This paper follows a previous paper (Hewitt-Taylor et al, 2012) in which the authors summarised their reflections on the literature relating to the application of research in practice. This paper builds on these reflections and reports on the findings from one aspect of a study that explored nurses' views on using research in practice. Quantitative methods of data collection and analysis were used and data were gathered using questionnaires. The findings suggest that nurses generally value research, but this does not necessarily mean that they base individual decisions on particular research findings, or that research is considered the most important form of evidence in direct practice. In addition, the resources that enable nurses to find, appraise and make decisions about using research, are not always readily available in practice settings. From this part of the study, it can be concluded that for research utilisation to increase, time, resources, role models and environments that support this ethos are needed, and that an emphasis on research should not eclipse other key forms of nursing knowledge such as patient views and experiences, and professional expertise in the promotion of evidence-based practice.

The data on this page was last updated at 13:55 on February 25, 2020.