Age and experience predict accurate short-term energy compensation in adults

This source preferred by Katherine Appleton

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Martins, C. and Morgan, L.M.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 56

Issue: 3

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1095-8304

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2011.01.032

Many factors thought to influence the control of food intake have been investigated independently, but the relative importance of each of these factors remains unknown. This study investigated the concurrent role of 21 factors in accurate compensation for energy consumed 60min previously. Energy compensation was assessed by measuring the difference in energy intake at an ad libitum test meal following two preloads of differing energy content, in 105 participants. Using regression, energy compensation was associated only with age (B=-2.39, β=-0.345, p<0.01), and accuracy of energy compensation was associated only with age (B=1.81, β=0.376, p<0.01) and order of preload presentation (B=-21.80, β=-0.233, p=0.01). These findings suggest that our ability to detect and/or adjust for energy intake deteriorates with age, and that individuals adjust more easily for missing, as opposed to additional, energy. Notably however, only these predictors were associated with energy compensation and they account for only 11-18% of total variance.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Martins, C. and Morgan, L.M.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 56

Issue: 3

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2011.01.032

Many factors thought to influence the control of food intake have been investigated independently, but the relative importance of each of these factors remains unknown. This study investigated the concurrent role of 21 factors in accurate compensation for energy consumed 60. min previously. Energy compensation was assessed by measuring the difference in energy intake at an ad libitum test meal following two preloads of differing energy content, in 105 participants. Using regression, energy compensation was associated only with age (B= -2.39, β= -0.345, p< 0.01), and accuracy of energy compensation was associated only with age (B= 1.81, β= 0.376, p< 0.01) and order of preload presentation (B= -21.80, β= -0.233, p= 0.01). These findings suggest that our ability to detect and/or adjust for energy intake deteriorates with age, and that individuals adjust more easily for missing, as opposed to additional, energy. Notably however, only these predictors were associated with energy compensation and they account for only 11-18% of total variance. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Martins, C. and Morgan, L.M.

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 56

Issue: 3

Pages: 602-606

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2011.01.032

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Martins, C. and Morgan, L.M.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 56

Issue: 3

Pages: 602-606

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

Many factors thought to influence the control of food intake have been investigated independently, but the relative importance of each of these factors remains unknown. This study investigated the concurrent role of 21 factors in accurate compensation for energy consumed 60min previously. Energy compensation was assessed by measuring the difference in energy intake at an ad libitum test meal following two preloads of differing energy content, in 105 participants. Using regression, energy compensation was associated only with age (B=-2.39, β=-0.345, p<0.01), and accuracy of energy compensation was associated only with age (B=1.81, β=0.376, p<0.01) and order of preload presentation (B=-21.80, β=-0.233, p=0.01). These findings suggest that our ability to detect and/or adjust for energy intake deteriorates with age, and that individuals adjust more easily for missing, as opposed to additional, energy. Notably however, only these predictors were associated with energy compensation and they account for only 11-18% of total variance.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on March 24, 2019.