Fruit and vegetable consumption in older individuals in Northern Ireland: levels and patterns

This source preferred by Katherine Appleton

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., McGill, R. and Woodside, J.V.

Journal: Br J Nutr

Volume: 102

Issue: 7

Pages: 949-953

eISSN: 1475-2662

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114509332122

Low intakes of fruit and vegetables have previously been reported in the older population of Great Britain, particularly among certain socio-demographic groups. Levels and patterns of consumption in the older population of Northern Ireland, however, remain unknown. A representative sample of 1000 members of the older population of Northern Ireland were contacted by telephone to assess average intake of all fruits and vegetables and various demographic details. Data from 426 individuals (representative of the whole population) reported a mean consumption of 4.0 (sd 1.3) and 4.1 (sd 1.3) portions of fruit and vegetables per weekday and per weekend day respectively. Regression analyses revealed greater consumption on weekdays by females (B 0.53; P < 0.01), younger individuals (B - 0.02; P = 0.01) and those living in less deprived areas (B - 0.01; P = 0.04), and greater consumption at weekends by females (B 0.54; P < 0.01) and younger individuals (B - 0.03; P = 0.01). The amount of fruit and vegetables consumed is slightly higher than that reported in older populations in Great Britain, possibly as a result of differences in farming practices and rural activities, although levels of consumption remain below current recommendations for health. Patterns of consumption are similar across the UK, and suggest that strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption should target males, older individuals and those living in more deprived areas.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., McGill, R. and Woodside, J.V.

Journal: British Journal of Nutrition

Volume: 102

Issue: 7

Pages: 949-953

eISSN: 1475-2662

ISSN: 0007-1145

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114509332122

Low intakes of fruit and vegetables have previously been reported in the older population of Great Britain, particularly among certain socio-demographic groups. Levels and patterns of consumption in the older population of Northern Ireland, however, remain unknown. A representative sample of 1000 members of the older population of Northern Ireland were contacted by telephone to assess average intake of all fruits and vegetables and various demographic details. Data from 426 individuals (representative of the whole population) reported a mean consumption of 4.0 (sd 1.3) and 41 (sd 1.3) portions of fruit and vegetables per weekday and per weekend day respectively. Regression analyses revealed greater consumption on weekdays by females (B 0.53; P<0.01), younger individuals (B 0.02; P=0.01) and those living in less deprived areas (B -0.01; P=0.04), and greater consumption at weekends by females (B 0.54; P<0.01) and younger individuals (B -0.03; P=0.01). The amount of fruit and vegetables consumed is slightly higher than that reported in older populations in Great Britain, possibly as a result of differences in farming practices and rural activities, although levels of consumption remain below current recommendations for health. Patterns of consumption are similar across the UK, and suggest that strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption should target males, older individuals and those living in more deprived areas.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M., McGill, R. and Woodside, J.V.

Journal: BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION

Volume: 102

Issue: 7

Pages: 949-953

ISSN: 0007-1145

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114509332122

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., McGill, R. and Woodside, J.V.

Journal: The British journal of nutrition

Volume: 102

Issue: 7

Pages: 949-953

eISSN: 1475-2662

ISSN: 0007-1145

Low intakes of fruit and vegetables have previously been reported in the older population of Great Britain, particularly among certain socio-demographic groups. Levels and patterns of consumption in the older population of Northern Ireland, however, remain unknown. A representative sample of 1000 members of the older population of Northern Ireland were contacted by telephone to assess average intake of all fruits and vegetables and various demographic details. Data from 426 individuals (representative of the whole population) reported a mean consumption of 4.0 (sd 1.3) and 4.1 (sd 1.3) portions of fruit and vegetables per weekday and per weekend day respectively. Regression analyses revealed greater consumption on weekdays by females (B 0.53; P < 0.01), younger individuals (B - 0.02; P = 0.01) and those living in less deprived areas (B - 0.01; P = 0.04), and greater consumption at weekends by females (B 0.54; P < 0.01) and younger individuals (B - 0.03; P = 0.01). The amount of fruit and vegetables consumed is slightly higher than that reported in older populations in Great Britain, possibly as a result of differences in farming practices and rural activities, although levels of consumption remain below current recommendations for health. Patterns of consumption are similar across the UK, and suggest that strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption should target males, older individuals and those living in more deprived areas.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:01 on March 20, 2019.