Body weight, body-weight concerns and eating styles in habitual heavy users and non-users of artificially sweetened beverages

This source preferred by Katherine Appleton

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Conner, M.T.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 225-230

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1006/appe.2001.0435

This study investigated reported body weight, concerns about body weight and eating styles in habitual heavy users (consume>825 ml/day) and habitual non-users of artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Groups of habitual heavy users (N=51) and non-users (N=69) were compared on measures of weight using self-reported body mass index (BMI), and measures of weight concern and eating style using the Dutch Eating Behaviors Questionnaire (DEBQ), the Yale Eating Patterns Questionnaire (YEPQ), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Habitual heavy users reported higher body weights (BMI), greater concerns about weight and greater tendencies toward certain eating styles, when compared to non-users. Using logistic regression, 82% of respondents were correctly classified as heavy or non-users of ASBs using body mass index and body-weight concerns. Associations between a heavy use of ASBs and certain eating styles can be explained by association with high body weights and concerns about body weight.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Conner, M.T.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 225-230

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1006/appe.2001.0435

This study investigated reported body weight, concerns about body weight and eating styles in habitual heavy users (consume > 825 ml/day) and habitual non-users of artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Groups of habitual heavy users (N = 51) and non-users (N = 69) were compared on measures of weight using self-reported body mass index (BMI), and measures of weight concern and eating style using the Dutch Eating Behaviors Questionnaire (DEBQ), the Yale Eating Patterns Questionnaire (YEPQ), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Habitual heavy users reported higher body weights (BMI), greater concerns about weight and greater tendencies toward certain eating styles, when compared to non-users. Using logistic regression, 82% of respondents were correctly classified as heavy or non-users of ASBs using body mass index and body-weight concerns. Associations between a heavy use of ASBs and certain eating styles can be explained by association with high body weights and concerns about body weight. © 2001 Academic Press.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Conner, M.T.

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 225-230

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1006/appe.2001.0435

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. and Conner, M.T.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 225-230

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

This study investigated reported body weight, concerns about body weight and eating styles in habitual heavy users (consume>825 ml/day) and habitual non-users of artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Groups of habitual heavy users (N=51) and non-users (N=69) were compared on measures of weight using self-reported body mass index (BMI), and measures of weight concern and eating style using the Dutch Eating Behaviors Questionnaire (DEBQ), the Yale Eating Patterns Questionnaire (YEPQ), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Habitual heavy users reported higher body weights (BMI), greater concerns about weight and greater tendencies toward certain eating styles, when compared to non-users. Using logistic regression, 82% of respondents were correctly classified as heavy or non-users of ASBs using body mass index and body-weight concerns. Associations between a heavy use of ASBs and certain eating styles can be explained by association with high body weights and concerns about body weight.

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